Here & Now

HD 1: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young

A live production from NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening, with timely, smart and in-depth news and conversation.

Here & Now has a successful track record: it began at WBUR in 1997 and is carried today by over 180 stations nationwide. Here & Now will expand from one to two hours on July 1 in collaboration with NPR. The expanded program will serve as a bridge in midday, between NPR’s signature news magazines, Morning Edition and All Things Considered. This marks the first time NPR has collaborated with a member station on a daily news program.

Here & Now has been hosted by Robin Young for more than a decade. A Peabody Award-winning journalist, she has reported for NBC, CBS and ABC television, and was substitute host and correspondent for The Today Show. Starting July 1, Young will be joined by co-host Jeremy Hobson, most recently host of Marketplace Morning Report. Hobson has broad producing, reporting and hosting experience at the station, program and network level. Additionally, Meghna Chakrabarti, co-host of WBUR’s Radio Boston, has been named as the program’s primary back-up host.

HD 1: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm
HD 2: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm

Ways to Connect

Mississippi Voters Weigh In On Syria

Sep 9, 2013

President Obama is expected to go to Capitol Hill tomorrow to try to persuade Congress to authorize his plan for military strikes on Syria — just hours before he addresses the nation at 9 p.m. Eastern.

Here & Now is hearing from people around the country on the issue.

Five years ago this week, the historic Wall Street institution Lehman Brothers collapsed.

With home prices falling and mortgage-backed securities in jeopardy, it was the worst panic on Wall Street since the Great Depression.

The Dow has now returned to pre-crisis levels, but have we learned anything since the Lehman collapse? Are we any safer?

KCRW’s DJ Travis Holcombe joins us regularly to play some of the music that’s been catching his ear.

This time, he is listening to new music from indie bands Franz Ferdinand, Larry Gus, Big Black Delta, and King Khan and the Shrines.

What Does 'The Fox' Say?

Sep 9, 2013

Think Old MacDonald meets Daft Punk.

It’s a YouTube video gone viral — answering the age-old (or maybe not-so-age-old) question: “What Does the Fox Say?”

More than 2 million viewers have clicked on the music video for “The Fox” over the last two days.

The video features outrageous costumes and an ethereal woodland scene. And momentum is only growing.

2020 Olympic City To Be Named This Weekend

Sep 9, 2013

The finalists to host the 2020 Summer Olympics in 2020 are Tokyo, Istanbul and Madrid.

The International Olympic Committee will announce the winner Saturday.

Then on Sunday, the IOC will announce if there will be new or returning sports added to the Games.

Finally on Tuesday, the IOC will select a new president to replace Jacques Rogge.

The U.S. economy added 169,000 jobs in August and the unemployment rate ticked down to 7.3 percent from 7.4 percent according to data from the Department of Labor.

August’s report has taken on special significance because it’s the last report before the Federal Reserve meets to decide whether to begin curtailing its stimulus.

Remembering The 1972 Olympic Massacre

Sep 5, 2013

As the International Olympic Committee meets to decide whether Tokyo, Istanbul or Madrid will host the 2020 summer Olympics, we look back to a terrible moment in Olympic history.

On September 5, 1972, Palestinian terrorists stormed into the apartment where 11 Israeli athletes were staying in Munich.

Two men were killed and the other nine were taken hostage. By the time the crisis ended, all of them were dead.

American marathon runner Kenny Moore and his roommate Frank Shorter were staying in a nearby apartment.

Fawaz Gerges is a longtime observer of the Middle East and fears the United States is rushing to take military action in Syria.

Gerges, a professor of international relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, says Assad’s use of force and likely use of chemical weapons against his people should not be tolerated.

Is This The End Of The College Boom?

Sep 5, 2013

The Census Bureau reports that the number of students pursuing college degrees has fallen for the first time since 2006.

The greatest decline happened among students age 25 and older.

Derek Thompson, business editor for The Atlantic, joins us to explain what the statistics mean.

Do You Have A Twitter 'Accent'?

Sep 4, 2013

With 500 million users and 500 tweets a day, the social networking site Twitter has changed the way we communicate. It also changes the way we write.

This year alone there were more than 100 Twitter-based studies. One study found that tweets often use words and spellings  that are consistent with — and unique to — the user’s region, reflecting local accents and terminology.

Update 3:30 p.m.: The Senate Foreign Relations Committee has voted 10 to 7 in favor of a resolution authorizing the use of force against Syria. No votes included Kentucky Republican Rand Paul, Florida Republican Marco Rubio and New Mexico Democrat Tom Udall.

There hasn’t been a formal debate about the use of military force in the U.S. Congress since the Iraq War.

Auto Industry Sees Growth In Summer Sales

Sep 4, 2013

Today is a good day in the car business. The summer sales season ended this Labor Day weekend, and automakers have released their sales figures.

The big car makers saw double-digit growth this August over the same time last year. It’s the best August since 2007 — before the economic collapse.

NPR’s Sonari Glinton joins us to discuss the most recent sales figures and what they mean for the industry.

The world’s most valuable toy company, Lego, no longer deals in just multicolored plastic bricks.

Lego has created a multimedia empire that runs on fans not only using Lego to build things, but as the basis for creating entirely new projects.

CBS and Time Warner ended their public contract dispute yesterday, marking a nearly one-month blackout in eight major markets.

The agreement restored the CBS network and affiliated channels such as Showtime.

While the two sides didn’t release details of the agreement, CBS did win a significant increase in re-transmission fees for its content, as well as a large segment of control in its digital future.

[Youtube]

The Rare Case Of The Military Execution

Sep 3, 2013

If Army Maj. Nidal Hasan is eventually executed, he will be the first person put to death by the U.S. military in more than 50 years.

Hasan, who was sentenced to death last week after being convicted of killing 13 people at Fort Hood in 2009, also faces what could be years of appeals, even though he did not really defend himself at his trial.

This has been the summer of some spectacular bombs at the box office, most notably “The Lone Ranger.”

But receipts overall were up. In fact, the box office gross is expected to set a record of $4.7 billion and films like “The Heat” and “The Conjuring” did surprisingly big business.

We look at the summer that was with Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr.

Note: Now that Nyad has reached shore, we have removed the live video stream.

Update 2:02 p.m.: She made it. On her fifth try, American swimmer Diana Nyad has become the first to swim to Florida from Cuba without a shark cage. She arrived this afternoon in Key West, where a crowd had gathered on the beach to see her achieve what Nyad called a “lifelong dream.”

State fairs in Maryland, Alaska, Nebraska, New York, Oregon, South Dakota, Minnesota and Michigan wrap up today.

Harvest Public Media reporters Amy Mayer, Abbie Fentress Swanson, Bill Wheelhouse and Jeremy Bernfeld sent us this audio postcard from the state fairs in Iowa, Missouri and Illinois.

Irish poet Seamus Heaney won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1995 and penned 13 collections of poetry, two plays and four books on the process of writing poetry.

He was widely considered the country’s greatest poet since William Butler Yeats.

Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny said, “There are no words to describe adequately our nation’s and poetry’s grief.”

Heaney’s early work surrounded the rural experience, but later writings took on the political and cultural struggles in Ireland.

A new documentary opening next week promises to shed light on the late J.D. Salinger, one of America’s most famous and mysterious authors.

One of the people who agreed to speak about the reclusive author is Joyce Maynard, who dropped out of Yale after her freshman year to live with Salinger in New Hampshire.

She received a lot of criticism for writing about that relationship in her 1998 memoir “At Home in the World.”

Along the Jersey Shore, many people are elevating their Sandy-damaged homes to lift them out of reach from future storms.

But lifting homes presents unique problems for elderly or disabled residents who call the Shore home.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Tracey Samuelson of WHYY explains.

If you’ve ever dreamed of being self-sufficient — living off the grid, in a home you built yourself — meet Lloyd Kahn.

Russia, Syria’s most powerful ally, is sending a large anti-submarine ship and a missile cruiser into the Eastern Mediterranean, as the U.S. moves toward a military response in Syria.

Russian president Vladimir Putin says the naval deployment is required for protecting Russian national security interests and not a threat to any nation.

Defense experts say the warships could give the Syrian regime early warning of missile launches, an possibly jam radars and navigational systems.

The NFL and more than 4,500 former players want to resolve concussion-related lawsuits with a $765 million settlement that would fund medical exams, concussion-related compensation and medical research, a federal judge said Thursday.

The plaintiffs include at least 10 members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, including former Dallas Cowboys running back Tony Dorsett. They also include Super Bowl-winning quarterback Jim McMahon and the family of Pro Bowl linebacker Junior Seau, who committed suicide last year.

Many of the people attending today’s commemoration of the March on Washington played roles big and small in the civil rights movement, from registering black voters in the South to helping to end school segregation.

Fifty years ago today, Martin Luther King Jr. unleashed a powerful and poetic torrent upon the nation — a passionate plea for racial equality and economic justice for African Americans.

Fifty years later, the “I Have a Dream” speech still resonates with a group of teenagers at William Smith High School in Aurora, a racially and ethnically diverse city east of Denver.

They recently sat down with Colorado Public Radio education reporter Jenny Brundin to watch the speech, talk about it and share their own dreams.

Syria Fallout: Expect Volatile Gas Prices

Aug 28, 2013

The U.S. stock market has seen the biggest sell-off since May last year, and overnight the wholesale price of gas jumped up 10 cents, a cost that may or may not be passed on to consumers at the pump.

Markets watcher Phil Flynn says the crisis in Syria is “not a positive” on the global economy.

U.S. Faces October Deadline On Debt Ceiling

Aug 27, 2013

Not being able to pay your bills is never a good thing — especially when you’re the United States government.

Treasury Secretary Jack Lew has announced that the U.S. will hit its $16.7 trillion borrowing limit in mid-October.

In 2011, the White House and congressional Republicans feuded over raising the debt ceiling, spending weeks trying to come to an agreement. Those talks failed and the financial markets roiled in reaction.

Saudi Prince's Goal: Topple Assad

Aug 27, 2013

As the U.S. weighs its options on Syria, there’s an effort underway by Saudi Prince Bandar bin Sultan al-Saud, a longtime power player with a Washington scandal in his past, to topple the Assad regime by training Syrian rebels in Jordan.

There are now four United States Navy destroyers positioned in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea — each equipped to fire cruise missiles at targets up to 1,500 miles away.

In a speech yesterday, Secretary of State John Kerry called the use of chemical weapons on Syrian civilians “a moral obscenity,” signaling a toughening stance by the Obama administration on the Assad regime.

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