Here & Now

HD 1: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young

A live production from NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening, with timely, smart and in-depth news and conversation.

Here & Now has a successful track record: it began at WBUR in 1997 and is carried today by over 180 stations nationwide. Here & Now will expand from one to two hours on July 1 in collaboration with NPR. The expanded program will serve as a bridge in midday, between NPR’s signature news magazines, Morning Edition and All Things Considered. This marks the first time NPR has collaborated with a member station on a daily news program.

Here & Now has been hosted by Robin Young for more than a decade. A Peabody Award-winning journalist, she has reported for NBC, CBS and ABC television, and was substitute host and correspondent for The Today Show. Starting July 1, Young will be joined by co-host Jeremy Hobson, most recently host of Marketplace Morning Report. Hobson has broad producing, reporting and hosting experience at the station, program and network level. Additionally, Meghna Chakrabarti, co-host of WBUR’s Radio Boston, has been named as the program’s primary back-up host.

HD 1: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm
HD 2: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm

Ways to Connect

The Justice Department this week focused new attention on the 2001 murder of federal prosecutor Thomas Wales in Seattle.

A conservative group on the UCLA campus, the Bruin Republicans, recently invited controversial far-right activist Milo Yiannopoulos to speak on campus — then quickly rescinded the offer.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with UCLA student Mariela Muro about why the group decided to uninvite Yiannopoulos.

In 2016, more than 20 percent of homeless people over age 50 were living in shelters, according to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. And that figure doesn’t include people living on the streets.

There have been thousands of spills from oil and gas pipelines in the U.S. over the past decade. When the Keystone XL, or any big transmission line, spills, it gets attention from the federal government and the public.

But in states like Ohio and Pennsylvania, thousands of miles of smaller pipelines are being built, connecting drilling well pads to the larger energy distribution system.

Lindsey Vonn won the bronze medal in the women’s downhill at the Winter Olympics in South Korea. Meanwhile, the U.S. men’s hockey team is out of the tournament.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR’s Russell Lewis (@NPRrussell) in Pyeongchang.

Walmart had strong holiday sales, but in its latest quarter, it reports online sales growth slowed. Walmart has made major investments in e-commerce to challenge Amazon.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with MSNBC’s Ali Velshi (@AliVelshi) about the company’s progress so far.

Academy Award-wining director, writer and animator Nick Park‘s new film “Early Man” pits cavemen versus Bronze Age-men in an epic soccer match.

“Being a non-soccer fan, I was really trying to make just an entertaining family comedy that happens to have soccer as a kind of a — you know, it’s an underdog prehistoric sports movie,” Park says.

Interview Highlights

On where the idea for “Early Man” came from

How Analog Audio Recording Lives On

Feb 19, 2018

It wasn’t that long ago that the things we heard on air — through speakers, through headphones — were recorded, edited and played back on magnetic tape, reel to reel, and later on cassettes. But, today, sound recording has totally changed and tape technology has all but been abandoned. Or, so one would think.

The U.S. women’s hockey team advanced to the gold medal final with a 5-0 win over Finland.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti gets an update on all of the Olympic action in Pyeongchang from NPR’s Russell Lewis (@NPRrussell).

NPR national security editor Phil Ewing (@philewing) joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss a federal grand jury indicting 13 Russian nationals for interfering with the 2016 U.S. election.

How One New York School Thwarted An Attack

Feb 16, 2018

Following the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 people dead, many are asking what could have been done to stop it from happening.

Some attacks have been thwarted before they were carried out. Here & Now‘s Robin Young finds out about one such instance in New York from Ruschell Boone (@RuschellBoone), a reporter with NY1.

Comic book and superhero fans in the U.S. are anxiously awaiting the opening of Marvel’s “Black Panther” in theaters Friday. Early reviews call it “exhilarating,” but also “groundbreaking.” That’s because “Black Panther” stars a black superhero.

Texas Standard’s Laura Rice (@LauraRiceKUT) reports from Austin.

American Mikaela Shiffrin won the gold medal in the women’s giant slalom Thursday. Meanwhile, the U.S. women’s hockey team lost to Canada 2-1 but remains alive in the tournament.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca (@pescami) about the results.

President Trump is weighing in on domestic violence allegations Wednesday. The controversy around former Trump staff secretary Rob Porter is front and center, and the House Oversight Committee is now investigating how the White House has handled the case.

Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins speaks with NPR’s Domenico Montanaro (@DomenicoNPR) for the latest.

James Hunter sings the blues, and he sings soul, too — two genres that trade in heartache and hard times.

His latest album “Whatever It Takes” sounds like a valentine, because the hard-scrabble school dropout from Britain has fallen in love, and married a fan from America.

Hunter (@JamesHunterSix) joins Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins to talk about the album.

Why Are Oil Prices Falling?

Feb 13, 2018

Oil prices have dropped more than 10 percent since late January. Meanwhile, shale companies in the U.S. are producing crude at a record clip.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with MSNBC’s Ali Velshi (@AliVelshi).

There’s been a steady shift in how many Americans prefer to live: a movement away from suburbia and a car-based existence, and a growing preference for walkable communities, urban centers and traditional Main Streets. In one very old New Hampshire town, Londonderry, private developers are trying to build a new shopping and residential district from scratch.

Todd Bookman (@toddbookman) from New Hampshire Public Radio reports.

The HBO documentary “May It Last” explores the making of The Avett Brothers’ album “True Sadness.”

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd caught up with Scott and Seth Avett last September before a show to talk about the documentary and the album.

About 5 percent of people in the U.S. suffer from seasonal affective disorder, a form of depression brought on by the dark days of winter. Many more may experience a mild form of the disorder.

Pregnancy can be challenging for mothers-to-be struggling with drug use, addiction or homelessness. Now, some of them are finding solace through a program that helps them write lullabies before their children are born.

Andrea Shea (@asheaarts) of WBUR has more.

Under Armour’s speedskating suits were blamed for the American team’s dismal showing at the 2014 Sochi games. A post-Olympic review by the U.S. team vindicated the technology. But the suits have been redesigned, and the company is hoping for redemption in 2018.

DJ Sessions: Fresh Funk For A Good Day

Feb 7, 2018

In this week’s Here & Now DJ Session, host Jeremy Hobson speaks with KCRW DJ Travis Holcombe (@TravisHolcombe), who shares his latest favorite funk-infused songs from artists including Ty Segall, Kali Uchis, and Superorganism.

The luxury restaurant Bob Bob Ricard (@bobbobricard) in London has adopted dynamic pricing, charging less during off-peak hours.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Leonid Shutov, founder and owner of Bob Bob Ricard, about how the pricing is affecting business.

President Trump’s immigration framework calls for eventual citizenship for young immigrants brought to the U.S. as children, funding for a border wall and crackdowns on legal and illegal immigration.

Rex Tillerson will wrap up his first tour of Latin America as U.S. secretary of state Wednesday. His focus is to drum up support in the region as the U.S. considers applying more pressure on the Venezuelan government, amid the country’s worsening political and humanitarian crisis.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Tim Padgett (@TimPadgett2), Americas editor with WLRN in Miami.

Recyclers in the United States are feeling the impact of China’s new strict standards for the recycling it imports from around the world. China wants to eliminate the contamination that comes with the plastic, paper and some metals, but because these new standards are very hard to meet, it is essentially a ban on foreign recyclables.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Joe Fusco, vice president at Casella Waste Systems, about what these changes mean for his company and the U.S. recycling industry.

The New England Patriots are hoping to claim their sixth championship in 16 years on Sunday, when the team takes the field in Minneapolis against the Philadelphia Eagles in Super Bowl LII.

Perhaps no one has been more mesmerized by the team’s success than its youngest fans. But as NPR’s Tovia Smith (@toviasmithnpr) reports, too much winning may actually be sending the wrong message to some kids.

President Trump gave his first State of the Union address on Tuesday night, but the week in politics was dominated by discussion surrounding the release of a Republican memo from the House Intelligence Committee alleging FBI surveillance abuse in the Russia investigation.

The Kenya government had ordered three TV stations off the air after they tried to broadcast the mock inauguration of an opposition political leader who lost the presidential race last year.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with NPR’s East Africa correspondent Eyder Peralta (@eyderp).

Alan Greenspan, former Federal Reserve chairman, this week said we are in both a stock market and bond market bubble.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with CNN’s Maggie Lake (@maggielake) about whether we should be worried.

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