Here & Now

HD 1: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young

A live production from NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening, with timely, smart and in-depth news and conversation.

Here & Now has a successful track record: it began at WBUR in 1997 and is carried today by over 180 stations nationwide. Here & Now will expand from one to two hours on July 1 in collaboration with NPR. The expanded program will serve as a bridge in midday, between NPR’s signature news magazines, Morning Edition and All Things Considered. This marks the first time NPR has collaborated with a member station on a daily news program.

Here & Now has been hosted by Robin Young for more than a decade. A Peabody Award-winning journalist, she has reported for NBC, CBS and ABC television, and was substitute host and correspondent for The Today Show. Starting July 1, Young will be joined by co-host Jeremy Hobson, most recently host of Marketplace Morning Report. Hobson has broad producing, reporting and hosting experience at the station, program and network level. Additionally, Meghna Chakrabarti, co-host of WBUR’s Radio Boston, has been named as the program’s primary back-up host.

HD 1: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm
HD 2: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm

Ways to Connect

The film “Wonder Woman” took in over $100 million at the box office in its first weekend, the biggest opening ever for a female director.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with historian Jill Lepore, author of “The Secret History of Wonder Woman,” about the evolution of the comic book character and Wonder Woman’s connection to feminism.

The start of the summer TV season means the return of audience favorites, plus dozens of series premieres. Networks are experimenting with reality competitions and comedies along with a new generation of game shows.

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans (@Deggans) joins Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd with more on what to expect from this summer’s lineup.

“I, Daniel Blake” won the top prize at last year’s Cannes Film Festival. On Friday, the gut-wrenching film about the struggles of living under England’s welfare system opens in U.S. theaters.

Howie Movshovitz (@HowieMovshovitz) of member station KUNC reports that it’s the latest from one of Britain’s greatest living filmmakers, Ken Loach.

The new Netflix movie “War Machine” features Brad Pitt as an American general commanding allied forces in Afghanistan. The film is a fictionalized account of the downfall of a real U.S. general, Stanley McChrystal, who was relieved of duty by President Obama after a less-than-flattering profile in Rolling Stone.

Locals put the crisis into a perspective that’s easy to understand.

Louisiana loses a football field of land every hour of the day.

“Even my customers are starting to recognize it now,” says charter boat captain Ripp Blank. “And it don’t come back once it leaves.”

Blank has been fishing the waters around Bayou Barataria — 30 miles or so north of the Gulf of Mexico — his entire life. If you’re a newcomer, it can be hard to discern where the water ends and the land begins.

There are reports that President Trump has decided to withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change. Wednesday morning, he tweeted that he will make a formal announcement this week.

A new oral history project at California’s Fresno State is documenting the roots of the hip-hop dance craze known as popping.

Alice Daniel from Here & Now contributor KQED has our story.

In the mid-1800s over half a million Americans migrated west in covered wagons along the Oregon Trail. They were searching for riches, claiming land and fleeing religious persecution.

But no one had authentically crossed the trail in a wagon in over a century — until Rinker Buck. Jakob Lewis of Here & Now contributor WPLN shares Buck’s story of facing the uncertainty of adventure, and the fleeting nature of arriving.

Demetri Martin is known for his stand-up comedy routines, his years as a correspondent on “The Daily Show” and his quirky drawings that have been featured in two books.

But in his new film “Dean” — which Martin directed, wrote and stars in — he takes a more serious turn, playing a young man struggling in the aftermath of his mother’s death.

Frank Deford, the longtime sportswriter for Sports Illustrated, died Sunday at his home in Key West, Florida. He was 78. Deford was known to millions for weekly commentaries he delivered on NPR’s Morning Edition for 37 years. His last commentary for NPR was on May 3.

In “Mischling,” author Affinity Konar tells the story of twins Pearl and Stasha, who are sent to Auschwitz in 1944 and are experimented on by Dr. Josef Mengele, known as the “Angel of Death.” Konar drew inspiration from the stories of real-life Auschwitz survivors.

“Mischling” was named one of the New York Times Book Review’s 100 Notable Books of 2016, and comes out in paperback on Tuesday.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young revisits a conversation with Konar from September.

In the 1980s, a Florida native named Edward Stierle created a ballet that was a response to the AIDS crisis. It also stands as its creator’s own requiem.

The company Dance Now Miami is performing “Lacrymosa” next week in Miami Beach. Alicia Zuckerman (@AliciaZuckerman) from Here & Now contributor WLRN has our story.

Danielle Belton (@blacksnob) of The Root speaks with Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti about stories trending online — from a photo of President Trump with Pope Francis, to a story about an African-American pageant winner who was arrested and spent a night in a

Coptic Christians Targeted Again In Egypt

May 26, 2017

More than 20 people were killed Friday when gunmen opened fire on a bus carrying Coptic Christians to a monastery in Egypt. There have been a number of recent attacks claimed by ISIS on Coptic Christians in the country.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson gets the latest from NPR’s Jane Arraf (@janearraf) in Cairo.

Imagine life without credit cards. If you couldn’t borrow money to finance a big purchase, how would you do it?

There’s growing evidence many people in the developing world are turning to gambling. Sonia Paul (@sonipaul) with 60db reports from Kampala, Uganda.

In Manchester, England, police have arrested eight people in connection with Monday night’s bombing at Manchester Arena. The investigation has also extended to Libya.

The bomber, Salman Abedi, spent three weeks there, and returned just days before the attack. Abedi’s father and brother have also been detained by Libyan authorities.

Leon Panetta, who served as director of the CIA and defense secretary under former President Obama, joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the Manchester bombing and national security issues during President Trump’s time in office.

Panetta is currently chairman of the Panetta Institute for Public Policy.

Air pollution may be disrupting your sleep, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Washington. Air pollution can cause a number of acute and chronic health problems, and even though some cities are making efforts improve air quality, it’s getting worse in many places around the world.

Moody’s Investors Services cut China’s credit rating for the first time since 1989 this week, changing its outlook from stable to negative.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with CNN’s Maggie Lake (@maggielake) about what’s behind the decision.

The Islamic State group has claimed responsibility for Monday night’s attack at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England. ISIS made the claim via one of its official news outlets, but it’s not yet clear how credible the claim is.

Disney Bets On 'Avatar' Theme Park

May 23, 2017

Eight years after “Avatar” came out, Disney is hoping the film’s success will translate to a new theme park. Pandora — The World of Avatar opens later this week near Orlando, Florida.

President Trump arrives in Rome on Tuesday after visiting Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas in Bethlehem, where Trump discussed countering terrorism and brokering peace.

NPR’s Daniel Estrin (@DanielEstrin) joins Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson to review Trump’s stop in Israel.

How Slack Has Changed The Workplace

May 22, 2017

The messaging app Slack describes itself as “team communication for the 21st century.” It lets people communicate online instantly in the office, individually or in teams. The company was valued at $3.8 billion in 2016 and says it has 5 million daily users.

President Trump's push to repeal the Affordable Care Act, crack down on illegal immigration and impose a ban on people trying to enter the U.S. from certain Muslim majority countries has many worried.

Suicide rates in the U.S. are at their highest in 30 years. In 2014, the last year for which there are official government figures, nearly 43,000 Americans killed themselves. That’s nearly four times as many as were shot to death by others.

The rise in suicide comes despite intensive prevention efforts by mental health professionals, citizen-volunteers, people affected by suicide, teachers, religious leaders and others.

Could the key to prevention be identifying people about to make an attempt?

Lisa Ko‘s debut novel “The Leavers” tells the story of Deming Guo, whose mother Polly, an immigrant from China living in the U.S. illegally, disappears when he’s 11 years old.

Guo is eventually adopted by a well-to-do white couple, but struggles with their expectations that he fit into their world.

The Washington Post reports this week that a federal program offering loan forgiveness for students working in the public or non-profit sectors may be on the chopping block in the soon-to-be-released Trump administration budget.

In the next month, New York state lawmakers are expected to vote on a bill that allows police to check a driver’s cellphone with a “textalyzer,” which can tell whether a driver swiped or tapped the phone in the run-up to a crash.

The global cyberattack known as WannaCry is on the wane Tuesday, having held data hostage on hundreds of thousands of computers in more than 100 countries since Friday.

Cybersecurity experts and intelligence agencies say the attack bears similarities to past attacks carried out by North Korea. Meanwhile, SpaceX launched one of its heaviest payloads yet: a 6-ton satellite from the British company Inmarsat.

As the nation’s opioid addiction and overdose crisis grows, the Cherokee Nation is launching the first-ever lawsuit against drug distributors that will be litigated in a tribal court.

The suit takes on companies including pharmacies CVS Health, Walgreens and Wal-Mart, and drug distributors Cardinal Health, Inc. and McKesson Corporation, alleging that they didn’t properly monitor prescription painkillers, which eventually “flooded” every Cherokee county.

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