Politics and Elections

Illinois legislators will only get a brief post-election respite from politics; a week from Wednesday they’ll be back in Springfield to begin the veto session.The current makeup of the General Assembly will remain in place for that, but come the new year -- when the Capitol welcomes a new set of lawmakers elected Tuesday night -- the balance of power will shift, slightly.

Election Day is like the Super Bowl of politics.

A day after the historic election of 2016, WSIU's Jennifer Fuller talks with Paul Simon Public Policy Insititute Analyst John Jackson about what the results mean, and what comes next in the political arena.

MIke Bost Wins Second Term in Congress

Nov 9, 2016
Mike Bost
Benjy Jeffords / WSIU

Incumbent Congressman Mike Bost won his reelection this evening against challenger CJ Baricevic.

After 2 years in Congress Mike Bost will be returning for two more and already has a plan.

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Monica Tichenor / WSIU Public Broadcasting

WSIU's Jennifer Fuller talks with Interim Paul Simon Public Policy Institute Director Jak Tichenor about the ramifications of Election 2016 in Illinois.

SIU

WSIU's Jennifer Fuller talks with retired Paul Simon Public Policy Institute Director David Yepsen about the long-lasting effects of Election 2016.

At many polling places across the state Tuesday, citizens will watch to make sure the process is handled in a legal way.

Voters in Jackson County will be asked next week whether they support a sales tax increase to help fund public schools.

Our two-part series looks at where Sen. Mark Kirk and U.S. Rep. Tammy Duckworth are on a few key issues, and why the politics of 2016 mean those policy positions may not have much effect on the outcome.

Illinois Republican U.S. Senator Mark Kirk has apologized for mocking his challenger Thursday night during a Springfield debate, and Democratic Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth accepted.

A relatively small crowd was there to hear it live, but thanks to social media, Kirk's gaffe was quickly heard (and criticized) round the nation.

In talking about the cost of war, Duckworth brought up that her family's military service goes back to the American Revolution.

Illinois voters aren't getting many chances to see their candidates for U.S. Senate face off. Democratic Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth and the incumbent -- Republican Mark Kirk -- met Thursday in Springfield. It was the first of only two televised debates, and their only downstate match-up.

The three candidates for Illinois’ 12th congressional district squared off in their only televised debate last Thursday night - and all agree more needs to be done to help the economy.

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Facebook

At a campaign stop in Carbondale Monday, Illinois 58th District Senate Candidate Sheila Simon talked to a group of mostly SIU students on the importance of voting in the Presidential Election. 

Illinois makes it tough for new party and independent candidates to run for office, especially when compared with the petition rules for Democratic and Republican candidates, but even a leading established party politician says the requirements are too tough.

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SIU

SIU's debate coach gives Hillary Clinton an A-minus, and Donald Trump an F for their third and final Presidential debate.

A pair of state legislators say this election season has exposed an ethics loophole that Illinois needs to close, but there are suspicions the introduction of the measure in the midst of a heated campaign season is itself a political gesture.

It's illegal for a director of a state agency, or any public employee for that matter, to use government resources for political purposes, but Illinois has no restrictions prohibiting agency directors from being identified by their title in campaign ads.

A key source of funding for the Department of Natural Resources could be blocked. Or maybe not.

Claims by one side — so far without evidence — that the coming presidential election will somehow be "rigged" are being echoed at campaign rallies and in one new poll of voters.

Donald Trump has questioned the integrity of the election, and there's been talk of the race for the Democratic nomination having been rigged at the expense of candidate Bernie Sanders.

The Girl on the Train. Suicide Squad. Bridget Jones's Baby.  

These are the movies showing now at a theater near you.

Throughout October, a handful of theaters are taking one night each to screen a smaller-budget film with much narrower appeal, starring Michael Madigan. Amanda Vinicky went to a screening last week at the Legacy Theater in Springfield.

(This post has been updated to reflect that a parody of the film is back online)


A proposed amendment to the state’s constitution would protect money set aside for transportation projects. Supporters say the change is needed because money that's supposed to be earmarked for building roads has gone to other expenses over the years. But the amendment could allow some of those practices to continue, while endangering other popular programs. 

He may be the state's highest-ranking Republican, but Gov. Bruce Rauner Thursday continued to be cagey about where he stands on Donald Trump.

Rauner has been asked about Trump by reporters time and time again. He usually answers something like "I'm not going to talk about politics, per se, or the Presidential election. I've made my statements clear."

But actually not all that clear.

Rauner in May said he would back his party's nominee; at the time Trump hadn't locked up the nomination, but he was close.

It took just a few minutes for the Affordable Care Act to feature in Sunday’s presidential debate between Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump as Trump quickly blamed the legislation for the rising cost of health care.

“When I watch what’s happening with some horrible things like Obamacare where your health insurance and health care is going up by numbers that are astronomical,” Trump said, adding that costs have gone up as much as 71 percent.

The Trump campaign has not said where he obtained his figures. But even though premiums are rising, the effect is concentrated on plans sold on the individual market not those that are provided through an employer. 

Illinois 58th district state senate candidate Sheila Simon was one of three democratic candidates to attend a Coffee and Candidates session Wednesday morning at Carbondale City Hall.

Regular voter registration in Illinois has closed.

The last day was Tuesday.

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Chicago Tribune

A new super-PAC that goes by the acronym "LIFT" is spending a million dollars on ads tying Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner to Donald Trump.

Most who watched the second presidential debate at Washington University will likely agree there was more jabbing and political rhetoric than substance.

Advocates are hoping the third and final debate will turn out differently.

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Getty Images

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner is finally weighing in on specific comments made by Donald Trump.

Rauner has repeatedly been asked about the presidential campaign - and why he wouldn’t talk about it despite being the state’s top Republican.

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Belleville News-Democrat

The democratic candidate in southern Illinois' 12th congressional district says the republican incumbent is not fit for the office.

Challenger C.J. Baricevic says comments made in 2005 by GOP Presidential candidate Donald Trump on his treatment of women should have signaled Congressman Mike Bost to withdraw his support of Trump.

When the new legislative session begins in January, someone new will represent the 58th Senate District in Illinois. Each candidate for the office thinks they have what it takes to bring change to Springfield.

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SIU

SIU Debate Coach Todd Graham gives Hillary Clinton a B and Donald Trump a D+ in their second debate.

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