Shimkus Says He Supports President's Call for Border Security Funding

Jan 3, 2019

A southern Illinois congressman is not optimistic about a quick resolution to the ongoing partial federal government shutdown.

Representative John Shimkus says he thinks the impasse between President Trump and House democrats will continue for the near future.

"I think the president and the leadership of the Senate, still in republican hands, and some money for border security has to be in that package."
 
The Collinsville republican says he stands firmly behind President Trump.
 
"Do you want a fence? Or do you not want a fence? Do you want border security? Or do you not want border security? That's kind of where we're at. So, in this debate, I'm for a fence and I'm for border security."
 
Shimkus says fences work in some areas along the southern border while monitoring equipment could suffice in other areas.

Hundreds of thousands of federal workers are out of work due to the partial government shutdown, while others are working without pay.

Shimkus says working for the federal government used to be beneficial; it may not be that way now.
 
"You usually didn't get paid as much as the private sector, but you had job security and good healthcare. Now, based upon these budgetary impasses, the job security aspect is not what it once was. People need to put that into their calculations of whether they want to work for the federal government or not."
 
The personal finance website, Wallet Hub, ranks Illinois 41st among states most affected by the partial government shutdown.

Democrats assumed control of the U.S. House Thursday. Shimkus says he hopes he and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi can work together on some issues.
 
"I point to an infrastructure bill, which again you have to have some funding mechanism. But, that's a bi-partisan thing, roads, bridges, rail, airports, the inland waterway system, all things that could use the attention of the federal government."
 
Pelosi becomes the sixth speaker to recapture the gavel after returning to the minority party. She if the first woman to do so.