Terrorism

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Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill is asking the Department of Homeland Security to give ``full consideration'' to an effort by the St. Louis Cardinals to enhance security and anti-terrorism measures at Busch Stadium.

Updated at 4:30 a.m. ET

Police in Manchester, England, confirm 22 people dead at Manchester Arena following an explosion after a concert by Ariana Grande. Nearly 60 people have been injured.

Authorities say they believe one man detonated an improvised explosive device, and was killed in the explosion. Chief Constable Ian Hopkins of the Greater Manchester Police said in a news conference,

Anyone charged of terrorism would be banned from having a gun under legislation introduced this week in Illinois. Calls for gun control have increased following a mass shooting earlier this month at an Orlando night club.

The proposed ban would also apply to someone who made terror-related threat, and is considered by a school official, mental health counselor or police officer to be a "clear and present danger."

The sponsor, Democratic State Representative Greg Harris of Chicago, describes it as a "pause."

The deadly attacks that ripped through Brussels' airport and a metro station on March 22 killed 32 people, according to Belgian Minister of Social Affairs and Health Maggie De Block.

Including three dead attackers, the total number of dead stands at 35. More than 300 people were injured in the blasts.

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The University of Illinois Urbana campus has 57 faculty and students traveling in or near Brussels, Belgium ... and has confirmed that all of them are safe after Tuesday morning's explosions in Brussels that left at least two dozen people dead.

More than 30 people are dead and more than 200 wounded after explosions struck Brussels during the Tuesday morning rush hour, Belgian officials say. Two blasts hit the international airport; another struck a metro station. Belgium issued a Level 4 alert, denoting "serious and imminent attack."

President Obama used a rare Oval Office address Sunday evening to speak to a worried nation about the evolving threat of terrorism and the growing influence of the Islamic State.

One of the biggest messages the president tried to communicate to the American people was that a fear of terrorist attacks must not translate into a fear of all Muslims and spark unnecessary targeting. But judging by the immediate response after the speech, Obama did little to bridge the partisan divide.