state of illinois

A new task force has been formed to combat opioid abuse in the state.

Illinois could soon begin to tackle its massive pile of unpaid bills ... thanks to a move Thursday by Governor Bruce Rauner.

Democrats are wondering: What took so long?

It’s been two months since Illinois government finally passed a full budget. Legislators hoped that would accelerate the payment of overdue bills, which total more than $15 billion. But the governor’s office is holding that up.

The Illinois state pension funds are among the worst-funded in the nation.  Yet, a new state law allows less money to be put toward that purpose. 

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Chicago Tribune

Governor Bruce Rauner has approved a major change in the way Illinois funds public schools.

He signed the bipartisan legislation at a school in Chicago, calling it a historic achievement.

Southern Illinois senators Dale Fowler and Paul Schimpf split their votes on the education funding plan approved by lawmakers.

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Brad Palmer, WSIU Radio

As part of the Illinois Department of Employment Security's modernization effort, Illinois employers will soon be able to use MyTax Illinois to complete all their unemployment insurance tax processes.

Department director Jeff Mays stopped in Carbondale Wednesday to remind employers about the change coming in less than two weeks.

The Illinois Senate is advancing the education funding reform compromise.

The bill restructures how money is paid out to districts, aiming for a more equitable system.

It took three different votes, but Illinois may finally be getting the new school funding formula lawmakers have been working on for the past few years. The state House of Representatives yesterday approved a new evidence-based school funding plan. It's a compromise, containing most of the plan Democrats proposed months ago, plus a new $75 million program that would provide tax credits to organizations offering private school scholarships.

Teachers unions criticized that provision.

But Representative Bob Pritchard, a Republican from Hinckley, says this school funding reform measure is one of the best things the Illinois House has done.

The Illinois House approved a new school funding plan Monday that will increase state money for all districts and provide $75 million in tax credits for people who donated to private school scholarships.

Illinois' legislative leaders met at the statehouse Sunday to draft what they hope will be the final touches on a school funding compromise. 

Illinois is getting tougher on those convicted of hate crimes. In the wake of Charlottesville, the legislature passed resolutions taking a stand against hate. But resolutions are not legally binding.

Senate Bill 1 was supposed to help Illinois cure its chronic case of inequitable school funding. The Democrat-sponsored measure has become a partisan controversy that's now preventing state money from being sent to schools.

Legislative leaders yesterday announced they'd achieved compromise, but reports that the deal includes a $75 million tax-credit program for private school tuition scholarships is drawing criticism.

Illinois' legislative leaders say they've reached a tentative agreement in the state's school funding fight, but details are still being worked out.

Hate crimes will be more punishable under a new law the governor signed this week.
 The measure was a result of suggestions from the state’s bi-partisan Holocaust and Genocide Commission.

Governor Bruce Rauner signs a bill to protect taxpayers from police pension fund abuse.

The legislation addresses a loophole in current law, that lets retired police officers who return to duty collect two pensions from the same pension fund.

Gov. Bruce Rauner vetoed a dozen bills late Friday. Among them: House Bill 3211, a measure that would help low-income students qualify for federal SNAP benefits, formerly known as food stamps. Statewide, that amounts to about 40,000 low-income students, says State Rep. Litesa Wallace (D-Rockford), who sponsored the measure.

Illinois Comptroller Susana Mendoza says she will likely have to skip another payment to the state's schools.

That's because of a political fight between Democrats in the legislature and Republican Governor Bruce Rauner.

Some Republican lawmakers say the Illinois State House of Representatives may not have the votes to override Governor Bruce Rauner's veto of a school funding bill Wednesday.

The Illinois State Senate spent Sunday in session, where Senators voted 38 to 19 to override Gov. Bruce Rauner's veto of the new school funding bill. The override wasn't a surprise, because this new evidence-based funding plan had originally cleared the Senate with a veto-proof majority. The House, however, represents a higher hurdle, where Democrats will need Republicans to vote with them. That vote is scheduled for Wednesday.

 

Sen. Andy Manar, the Bunker Hill Democrat who sponsored the measure, says he'd rather negotiate a compromise.

School districts are due to receive state funds Thursday, but that can't happen until the lawmakers either override Governor Bruce Rauner's veto of Senate Bill 1 or come up with some other plan he will sign.

Another voice is urging Gov. Bruce Rauner to work with the budget that was passed over his objections.

Gov. Bruce Rauner criticized Democrats' call Monday to borrow money to take a chunk out of a $14.4 billion pile of overdue bills.        

Illinois Public Radio Station WBEZ has learned negotiations over school funding in the state have a potential voucher program on the table.

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Illinois 2020

One lucky brewery will get to make the official craft beer of Illinois' bicentennial celebration.

The sponsor of a plan overhauling how Illinois funds schools says Gov. Bruce Rauner's proposed changes are an ``all-out assault'' on public education that would mean less state spending on schools over time.

Governor Bruce Rauner Tuesday vetoed significant portions of legislation that would overhaul the way Illinois funds public schools.

Much of the legislation has bipartisan support. But, the governor took issue with Democratic provisions meant to help Chicago Public Schools.

The Democrat-controlled Legislature appears headed to another showdown with Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner after sending him the school funding reform bill Monday afternoon.

Governor Bruce Rauner complained again Thursday that he still hasn't gotten his hands on Senate Bill 1, the Democrat-sponsored legislation that would change the state's school funding formula.

After the first day of a special session on education, Democratic lawmakers and the Republican Governor Bruce Rauner appear no closer to resolving the dispute that could hold up money for school districts. Rauner continues to demand Democrats send him the funding plan so he can change it and remove additional money for Chicago teacher pensions.

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