state of illinois

Illinois' legislative leaders say they've reached a tentative agreement in the state's school funding fight, but details are still being worked out.

Hate crimes will be more punishable under a new law the governor signed this week.
 The measure was a result of suggestions from the state’s bi-partisan Holocaust and Genocide Commission.

Governor Bruce Rauner signs a bill to protect taxpayers from police pension fund abuse.

The legislation addresses a loophole in current law, that lets retired police officers who return to duty collect two pensions from the same pension fund.

Gov. Bruce Rauner vetoed a dozen bills late Friday. Among them: House Bill 3211, a measure that would help low-income students qualify for federal SNAP benefits, formerly known as food stamps. Statewide, that amounts to about 40,000 low-income students, says State Rep. Litesa Wallace (D-Rockford), who sponsored the measure.

Illinois Comptroller Susana Mendoza says she will likely have to skip another payment to the state's schools.

That's because of a political fight between Democrats in the legislature and Republican Governor Bruce Rauner.

Some Republican lawmakers say the Illinois State House of Representatives may not have the votes to override Governor Bruce Rauner's veto of a school funding bill Wednesday.

The Illinois State Senate spent Sunday in session, where Senators voted 38 to 19 to override Gov. Bruce Rauner's veto of the new school funding bill. The override wasn't a surprise, because this new evidence-based funding plan had originally cleared the Senate with a veto-proof majority. The House, however, represents a higher hurdle, where Democrats will need Republicans to vote with them. That vote is scheduled for Wednesday.

 

Sen. Andy Manar, the Bunker Hill Democrat who sponsored the measure, says he'd rather negotiate a compromise.

School districts are due to receive state funds Thursday, but that can't happen until the lawmakers either override Governor Bruce Rauner's veto of Senate Bill 1 or come up with some other plan he will sign.

Another voice is urging Gov. Bruce Rauner to work with the budget that was passed over his objections.

Gov. Bruce Rauner criticized Democrats' call Monday to borrow money to take a chunk out of a $14.4 billion pile of overdue bills.        

Illinois Public Radio Station WBEZ has learned negotiations over school funding in the state have a potential voucher program on the table.

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Illinois 2020

One lucky brewery will get to make the official craft beer of Illinois' bicentennial celebration.

The sponsor of a plan overhauling how Illinois funds schools says Gov. Bruce Rauner's proposed changes are an ``all-out assault'' on public education that would mean less state spending on schools over time.

Governor Bruce Rauner Tuesday vetoed significant portions of legislation that would overhaul the way Illinois funds public schools.

Much of the legislation has bipartisan support. But, the governor took issue with Democratic provisions meant to help Chicago Public Schools.

The Democrat-controlled Legislature appears headed to another showdown with Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner after sending him the school funding reform bill Monday afternoon.

Governor Bruce Rauner complained again Thursday that he still hasn't gotten his hands on Senate Bill 1, the Democrat-sponsored legislation that would change the state's school funding formula.

After the first day of a special session on education, Democratic lawmakers and the Republican Governor Bruce Rauner appear no closer to resolving the dispute that could hold up money for school districts. Rauner continues to demand Democrats send him the funding plan so he can change it and remove additional money for Chicago teacher pensions.

Illinois legislators are headed to the Capitol for a special session on school funding called by Gov. Bruce Rauner.

Governor Calls Special Session on School Funding

Jul 24, 2017

Sticking to his promise, Governor Bruce Rauner is calling lawmakers back to Springfield to discuss school funding.

Governor Bruce Rauner is threatening a special session if lawmakers don't send him the education funding reform bill they passed.

The measure is sitting in the Senate and Governor Rauner says lawmakers have until noon on Monday to advance it.

A major credit rating agency says Illinois' rating won't be lowered to ``junk'' but warns the state still faces serious financial challenges and long-term risks.

Moody's Investors Service on Thursday affirmed Illinois' current rating with a negative outlook, saying a downgrade remains possible in the next two years.

Illinois' two-year budget stalemate is still having an effect, even though lawmakers approved a spending plan that is getting the cash flowing again.

People
Brian O'Keefe, IPR

What is a common illness can turn into a catastrophic brain disease that, until now, health insurance companies didn't cover.

The ACLU accuses a juvenile detention facility in southern Illinois of improperly and unnecessarily seeking prosecutions of several dozen detainees.

Illinois' budget stalemate is over but those who work with children in the state say a lot of ground was lost while lawmakers disagreed.

A major bond-rating agency says Illinois' fiscal challenges linger despite approval of the first state budget in two years.

Moody's Investors Service issued a report Friday. It notes that an income tax increase approved this month will generate nearly $5 billion more a year.

In a maneuver some state lawmakers call a "booby trap," the spending plan approved last week says Illinois can't appropriate money for schools unless a new funding formula also wins approval.

The Illinois State Board of Elections says it won't provide information about registered voters to President Donald Trump's voting commission.

Illinois Treasurer Mike Frerichs is offering some suggestions to help make sure the state avoids junk bond status.

Although Illinois now has a budget, the state's fiscal condition remains on very shaky ground and a rating downgrade could still happen. Treasurer Frerichs says for starters, the governor needs to pay a visit to the bond houses in New York.

The Illinois State Comptroller is voicing an optimistic, yet cautious message now that the two-year-old state budget impasse is over.

Susana Mendoza says the bond rating agencies can rest assured the state can continue honoring its commitments to bond-holders and the pension funds.

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