School Safety

  

Last week, the U.S. Secret Service released a guide for preventing school violence. Issued in response to recent massacres in Parkland, Florida, and Santa Fe, Texas, it’s subtitled “An Operational Guide for Preventing Targeted School Violence.”

But closer to home, a group from the Illinois Terrorism Task Force had already presented a very similar set of recommendations back in April.

Federal funds are now available to improve security at schools.

Governor Bruce Rauner has a track record of handing the toughest topics to small bipartisan panels of legislators.

These so-called working groups have been tasked with solving the budget, pensions, and criminal justice reform. And weeks after the Florida mass shooting, he formed a working group on public safety. But like the others, that group meets in private.

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Brad Palmer, WSIU Radio

A trio of southern Illinois school districts this week learned about how to fund school safety improvements.

Administrators from Vienna District 55, North Wayne District 200 in Cisne and Norris City-Omaha-Enfield District 3 heard about various bond and loan options.

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Brad Palmer, WSIU Radio

The issue of school safety remains a hot topic as another academic year winds down.

Wednesday, Baysinger Architects in Marion hosted a School Building Safety Lunch and Learn for area school and law enforcement officials.

This past weekend across the country and across Illinois,  high-school students by the thousands took part in marches to push for reforms to prevent school shootings.  WSIU's Kevin Boucher  recently caught up with 12th District US Congressman Mike Bost.

School Safety Measure Passes U.S. House

Mar 15, 2018
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C-SPAN

A bill aimed to protect students from school shootings passed the U.S. House this week.

The STOP School Violence Act would place emergency buttons in the classrooms. They would be similar to those used at banks in case of a robbery.

Researchers from SIU-Carbondale are partnering with 40 schools in southern Illinois to assess school safety, bullying and ways to promote a safe, supportive learning environment.

Performance expectations may increase for Illinois 3rd through 8th graders under a plan being discussed in Springfield.

The State Board of Education is considering upping the standards for the Illinois Standards Achievement Test or I-SAT.  Board spokesman Matt Vanover says they want to make sure the test better measures whether or not students are learning what they need to. Vanover says the change would bring state standards more in line with other measurements for college readiness. He acknowledges that scores will likely drop under the new system.

Governor Pat Quinn held a summit on school safety Tuesday in Springfield. The gathering was spurred by last month's shooting at an elementary school in Connecticut.