School funding

Just when you thought the state’s controversial battle over school funding was over, it turns out there’s a few technicalities that need to be addressed.

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Governor Bruce Rauner has approved a major change in the way Illinois funds public schools.

He signed the bipartisan legislation at a school in Chicago, calling it a historic achievement.

Southern Illinois senators Dale Fowler and Paul Schimpf split their votes on the education funding plan approved by lawmakers.

The Illinois Senate is advancing the education funding reform compromise.

The bill restructures how money is paid out to districts, aiming for a more equitable system.

The Illinois House approved a new school funding plan Monday that will increase state money for all districts and provide $75 million in tax credits for people who donated to private school scholarships.

Senate Bill 1 was supposed to help Illinois cure its chronic case of inequitable school funding. The Democrat-sponsored measure has become a partisan controversy that's now preventing state money from being sent to schools.

Legislative leaders yesterday announced they'd achieved compromise, but reports that the deal includes a $75 million tax-credit program for private school tuition scholarships is drawing criticism.

Illinois' legislative leaders say they've reached a tentative agreement in the state's school funding fight, but details are still being worked out.

School districts are due to receive state funds Thursday, but that can't happen until the lawmakers either override Governor Bruce Rauner's veto of Senate Bill 1 or come up with some other plan he will sign.

The Democrat-controlled Legislature appears headed to another showdown with Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner after sending him the school funding reform bill Monday afternoon.

Illinois state Republicans are introducing a new package of bills they say is their effort to end the budget impasse.

 

The Republicans’ proposal includes some of the same ideas that were sticking points for Democrats, including the length of a property tax freeze and how much to raise income taxes.

The fate of school funding reform in Illinois hinges on downstate sentiment about Chicago Public Schools, and legislators' grasp of a complex, new formula. The governor has already pledged to veto the legislation. And now, the battle has State Sen. Andy Manar accusing Education Secretary Beth Purvis of lying.

Details of Illinois senate republicans’ school funding plan were revealed this week.

One week after State Senator Jason Barickman held a press conference to announce his own school funding plan, he filed two amendments totaling 500 pages.

On the final day of the fiscal year Thursday ... Illinois lawmakers have passed a temporary budget and sent it to Governor Rauner.

Republican Governor Bruce Rauner Tuesday ripped a Democratic plan to fund schools in the new fiscal year that begins Friday, repeating criticism that it amounts to a ``bailout'' of Chicago Public Schools.

Democrats argue their plan treats Chicago schools the same as every other Illinois district.

A plan to move Illinois to a graduated income tax is dead.

Wednesday was the final scheduled day for lawmakers to advance it. Instead, the Illinois House adjourned without taking a vote.

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A group of downstate lawmakers Thursday urged their colleagues to pass a budget that would include equitable funding for public school children.

Let's begin with a choice.

Say there's a check in the mail. It's meant to help you run your household. You can use it to keep the lights on, the water running and food on the table. Would you rather that check be for $9,794 or $28,639?

It's not a trick question. It's the story of America's schools in two numbers.

The top Senate Democrat in Springfield says poor school districts aren’t getting their fair share of state money.

And he says lawmakers shouldn’t approve an education budget until that’s fixed.

Most school districts in Illinois would get an increase in state aid if a budget request approved Wednesday by the State Board of Education is adopted. But some wealthy schools would see less state money.