Pete Peterson

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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

You may have heard the story recently about a Major League Baseball umpire saving a woman who apparently was about to jump off a bridge in Pittsburgh.

In this edition of Reading Baseball, Pete Peterson talks about the city's history of bridge jumpers and how this lifesaving move has a deeper meaning.

Reading Baseball is a series of essays and commentaries by Richard "Pete" Peterson, the co-author, with his son, Stephen, of  The Slide: Leyland, Bonds and the Star-Crossed Pittsburgh Pirates, and the editor of  The St. Louis Baseball Reader.

 

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Josh Gibson Foundation

Baseball and opera may not seem like a match made in heaven, but there are instances where the two make a good combination.

In his latest edition of Reading Baseball, Pete Peterson talks about two baseball operas, including one he saw for himself.

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The Pittsburgh Marathon is this weekend.

Once again, WSIU's Reading Baseball contributor Pete Peterson will be taking part in the event's half marathon.

In this special commentary, Pete talks about getting more and more reminders about how unusual it is for a man of his "advanced" age to be running mile after mile.


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Amazon

Tis the season for gift-giving and celebrating with family and friends.

In this holiday edition of Reading Baseball, Pete Peterson has some ideas on what gifts NOT to give.

The Smithsonian Museum of African-American History and Culture recently opened in Washington D.C.

In this edition of Reading Baseball, Pete Peterson talks about baseball's connection to the museum.

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Amazon

The Chicago Cubs are one step away from their first World Series appearance since 1945.

But, in this edition of Reading Baseball, Pete Peterson tells us how a short story warns a Cubs pennant could mean bad things for all of us.

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llbws.org

The Major League Baseball fall classic is referred to as the World Series, even though the teams competing for it all hail from North America.

In this edition of Reading Baseball, Pete Peterson looks at a true World Series, in which youngsters from around the globe compete to be the best.

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seamheads.com

Racism is a hot topic in the United States.

Jackie Robinson made history in 1947 when he broke baseball's color barrier. In this edition of Reading Baseball, Pete Peterson tells us about a man, who was a good ballplayer in his day, but is remembered more for his hatred of Robinson.


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Courier Mail

The recent death of Muhammad Ali - who some consider the most charismatic and controversial sports figure of the 20th century - showed how the former boxing champion overcame the controversies of his past to become a beloved figure across the world.

In this edition of Reading Baseball, Pete Peterson looks at how Ali and baseball Hall of Famer Roberto Clemente helped him overcome his own racial intolerance by being more than the sum of their athletic gifts.
 

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Reading Baseball is a series of essays and commentaries by Richard "Pete" Peterson, the author of Pops: The Willie Stargell Story and Growing Up With Clemente.
 

Reading Baseball is a series of essays and commentaries by Richard "Pete" Peterson, the author of Pops: The Willie Stargell Story and Growing Up With Clemente.
 

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Reading Baseball is a series of essays and commentaries by Richard "Pete" Peterson, the author of Pops: The Willie Stargell Story and Growing Up With Clemente.
 

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Reading Baseball is a series of essays and commentaries by Richard "Pete" Peterson, the author of Pops: The Willie Stargell Story and Growing Up With Clemente.
 

Ray Chapman Grave
Wikipedia

Reading Baseball Commentator Pete Peterson remembers Ray Chapman.

Baseball Cards
www.pixabay.com

Reading Baseball's Pete Peterson takes a look back at the origin, and life, of baseball trading cards.

Remembering Kent Haruf

Dec 19, 2014
The Southern Illinoisan

The Christmas holiday season is a time to spend with family and friends, but it can also be a time to remember the special people in our lives who we've lost.