Guns

How To Stop Gun Violence? Just Ask

May 18, 2018

Conversations around gun violence often revolve around long-term solutions, like improving schools or the local economy.

But even if those things were easy — and they’re not — it would take a generation to realize the benefits.

And for the Illinoisans living and dying in these communities — mostly low-income, black communities — they don’t have time to wait.

For many families and young adults living in Peoria’s South Side, gun violence is too often a part of life and something they’ve been fighting against — with few resources.

Part of the challenge, according to researchers, is getting the broader community to examine a part of itself and confront the barriers that keep families, predominantly minorities, from moving out of poverty.

Abigail Irby Fights For Family, Community Despite Loss

May 16, 2018

In Peoria, at least 251 people were hurt and 26 killed by gun violence between 2015 and 2017.

Abigail Irby moved her family to the South Side of Peoria because she felt called to make a difference. Twenty years later, she's a survivor of the chronic violence felt across the state and says, “I’m not going anywhere until God says it’s time for me to go.”

Suicide A Driver Of Gun Deaths In Rural America

May 16, 2018
People
Courtesy Beth Martinez

The national conversation around gun violence generally centers around mass shootings, school shootings and gang activity. These problems need to be addressed, but may overshadow the largest group affected: suicide victims.

His name was Devon McClyde, and he was 16 years old when he was caught in the crossfire of an argument while playing basketball one evening in a local park in Danville on June 8, 2016.

He died three days later – the victim of another gun crime in Central Illinois.

 


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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now to Southern Illinois and a story about counties that are declaring themselves sanctuaries for firearms. From member station WUIS in Springfield, Rachel Otwell reports.

A state lawmaker wants to give Illinois police officers more power to take away guns from someone who might be dangerous.

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner Tuesday vetoed the only gun-control legislation to reach his desk ... since last month’s shooting in Parkland, Florida.

The legislation would require gun dealers be licensed by the state. Backers say it would help keep guns away from criminals.

The push is on in Springfield to pass some sort of gun control measures in the wake of the deadly shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida on Valentine's Day.

Images
Carterville Police

A Carterville man is in custody after police found him with a semi-automatic weapon.

Carterville Police officers responded to 703 Laclede Avenue Sunday morning around 7 and found 23-year-old Gregory Martin wearing a green army helmet, a ballistic vest and armed with an AR-15 rifle.

The issue of gun ownership has returned to the forefront after mass shootings at a Las Vegas country music festival in October and in a Texas church last month. Most of the concerns revolve around restrictions on gun purchases and who can own what type of weapon.

Things could get a little murky from a legal standpoint if you happen to inherit a gun from a loved one. In This week’s Friday Forum, we look at the case of a Rockford woman who found herself in such a situation.

The Illinois House is advancing legislation to ban “bump stocks.” The devices gained national prominence this month, when they were reportedly used by the Las Vegas shooter.

State and federal legislators from Illinois are proposing new laws in response to Sunday’s mass shooting in Las Vegas.

People
Governor's office

Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner Tuesday signed into law a measure that would increase the sentences for illegal gun sales.

People with a record of firearms offenses who try to sell guns will face harsher penalties. The governor says the law targets so-called straw purchasers.

Anyone charged of terrorism would be banned from having a gun under legislation introduced this week in Illinois. Calls for gun control have increased following a mass shooting earlier this month at an Orlando night club.

The proposed ban would also apply to someone who made terror-related threat, and is considered by a school official, mental health counselor or police officer to be a "clear and present danger."

The sponsor, Democratic State Representative Greg Harris of Chicago, describes it as a "pause."

Several guns bills have been proposed this legislative session in Illinois.

Some of the bills have gained some traction...where others have stalled.

Gov. Bruce Rauner says passage of his pro-business Turnaround Agenda would help to curb violence in Chicago. Rauner recently said he's "disappointed" in how the Mayor Rahm Emanuel has handled the outcry over video of a police officer killing Laquan McDonald, a black teenager.

There have been 45 school shootings in the U.S. this year, but U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin says gun control measures are blocked by what he calls a "death grip" by the National Rifle Association.

President Obama gave impassioned remarks Thursday calling for stricter gun laws following a deadly shooting in Oregon. He spoke for just over 10 minutes, excoriating Congress for refusing to pass gun reform legislation. He also called on state legislatures and governors to act and on regular Americans to "think about how they can get our government to change these laws," which, he said, "will require a change of politics on this issue."

The question of whether members of the military should be allowed to arm themselves is getting more attention in the wake of last week's shooting death of five service members in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Hunters and other gun owners would be allowed to use silencers under a bill filed in the Illinois legislature.

Talks are expected this week to find a middle ground on a gun bill that would send offenders to jail for three years if they commit a crime with a gun in Illinois.

A measure that would allow Illinois residents to carry concealed firearms is heading to the House floor after lawmakers approved it in committee Thursday morning.

As Illinois lawmakers continue their negotiations on a concealed-carry bill in Springfield, the state's top attorney is asking for more time to appeal a decision ordering the plan to move forward.

The Illinois House has rejected a measure that would require $1 million in liability insurance for people carrying concealed weapons.

Illinois Gov.Pat Quinn  and Senate President John Cullerton are promising support for an effort to curb gun violence.

On Sunday, about 400 people packed into the Chicago Sinai Congregation to hear a host of speakers. Some, like Quinn, Cullerton and U.S. Rep Jan Schakowski are promising to help find organizations and companies that might help convince manufacturers to do things like work to prevent criminals and people with a history of gun violence and others from getting their hands on guns.

Members of the Illinois House had an angry debate Tuesday over legislation that would allow people to carry concealed weapons in public.

The House Judiciary Committee has begun a series of hearings this week on the issue of Concealed Carry and other gun legislation.

A new poll from the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute shows voters support tougher gun ownership laws nearly two-to-one over those who want fewer restrictions on gun ownership.

Seventy percent of those polled also favored stricter laws regarding the sale of guns and ammunition.

The poll comes on the heels of catastrophic shootings in Connecticut and Colorado, where dozens of people were shot and killed.

The poll shows Illinois voters favor a ban on high-capacity ammunition clips, as well as a ban on semi-automatic assault rifles.

Northern Illinois University President John Peters has provided input to Vice President Joe Biden's task force on reducing gun violence.

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