Education Funding

Details of Illinois senate republicans’ school funding plan were revealed this week.

One week after State Senator Jason Barickman held a press conference to announce his own school funding plan, he filed two amendments totaling 500 pages.

A Republican state senator from Bloomington Wednesday became the third legislator to introduce a competing education funding plan.

Democratic state Sen. Andy Manar says he will remain in the Illinois Senate rather than run for governor in 2018.

In an emailed statement Friday, the Bunker Hill resident says he plans to continue being "a strong voice for the citizens of Central Illinois" in the Legislature.

School funding has been one of the most hotly debated issues in the statehouse, but in recent days, there’s been a glimmer of hope. A Democrat filed new funding plan, and a key Republican in the Illinois Senate appeared to endorse it, issuing a statement saying that he was “cautiously optimistic.” Was this the beginning of a bipartisan solution? We decided to do a reality check.

 

Education leaders from all over the state converged on Carbondale Friday, trying to move the issue of education funding forward in Illinois.

WSIU's Jennifer Fuller talks with Jak Tichenor and Delio Calzolari about the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute's upcoming Education Funding Forum.

People
Brad Palmer, WSIU Radio

Governor Bruce Rauner Tuesday visited Herrin Junior High School and discussed the need to pump more funding into K through 12 education.

A group of lawmakers has agreed on a framework for making the way Illinois funds its schools more equitable. But whether it will lead to a long-elusive legislative fix remains to be seen.

When it comes to equity in school funding, Illinois ranks last among all 50 states. So over the summer, various groups of lawmakers have been meeting with stakeholders, trying to come up with a plan that will send state dollars to the school districts that genuinely need help. Brent Clark has been attending all those meetings.

When it comes to school funding, Illinois has been ranked as the worst in the country because our system is so inequitable. Basically that means some schools offer a lot of advanced placement courses and have fancy science labs and swimming pools, while other schools can’t afford new math books and have to cut their band programs. The fight over how to fix this has gone on for years.

In July, Gov. Bruce Rauner announced that he was creating a bipartisan commission to change the way Illinois funds public schools. That commission held its third meeting yesterday. But there’s another commission tackling the same topic, and its founder claims her group is getting more work done.

Republican Governor Bruce Rauner Tuesday ripped a Democratic plan to fund schools in the new fiscal year that begins Friday, repeating criticism that it amounts to a ``bailout'' of Chicago Public Schools.

Democrats argue their plan treats Chicago schools the same as every other Illinois district.

Over 100 educators from more than 30 different school districts in southern Illinois attended a two-day professional development workshop this week in Williamson County.

If there’s one thing Illinois lawmakers agree on, it’s that they want schools to open on time in the fall. Yet the Illinois legislature adjourned last week with no school budget in place. That’s because when you ask lawmakers how to pay the teachers and principals and utility bills, they will bicker about it all session long. Their disagreement has left educators across the state saying W-T-F. And you know what that stands for... 

The head of the Murphysboro School District is warning parents, faculty and staff that - without state funding - the district cannot make it through the upcoming academic year.

People
Brad Palmer, WSIU Radio

Governor Rauner toured the state Wednesday to rip the democratic leadership for not approving a balanced budget before Tuesday night's deadline for the spring session.

Illinois’ school funding formula relies heavily on property taxes.

 

That leaves districts with low land values to make do with about six thousand dollars per student each year, while districts with thriving businesses can spend up to five times that amount.

 

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle agree that Illinois needs to change the formula, but they get caught on the question of how.

Illinois Senators have voted to change how Illinois funds schools.

A plan to move Illinois to a graduated income tax is dead.

Wednesday was the final scheduled day for lawmakers to advance it. Instead, the Illinois House adjourned without taking a vote.

The Kansas Supreme Court gave state lawmakers an ultimatum:

Make school funding more equitable by June 30, or it will consider shutting down the state's public schools.

Since then, things have gotten ugly.

Lawmakers followed up with a plan — to make it easier to impeach Supreme Court judges who attempt to "usurp the power" of the Legislature or governor.

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Facebook

A group of downstate lawmakers Thursday urged their colleagues to pass a budget that would include equitable funding for public school children.

Let's begin with a choice.

Say there's a check in the mail. It's meant to help you run your household. You can use it to keep the lights on, the water running and food on the table. Would you rather that check be for $9,794 or $28,639?

It's not a trick question. It's the story of America's schools in two numbers.