Education Funding

Governor Calls Special Session on School Funding

35 minutes ago

Sticking to his promise, Governor Bruce Rauner is calling lawmakers back to Springfield to discuss school funding.

Governor Bruce Rauner is threatening a special session if lawmakers don't send him the education funding reform bill they passed.

The measure is sitting in the Senate and Governor Rauner says lawmakers have until noon on Monday to advance it.

A pair of southern Illinois lawmakers says Democratic leaders need to send Governor Rauner the education funding formula measure he promises to veto.

Lawmakers approved a state budget more than a week ago, but that legislation requires enactment of a new school-funding plan.

Governor Bruce Rauner is eager to use his veto pen to alter the school funding reform plan adopted by the General Assembly in June.  There’s just one problem: It’s not on his desk.

The shakeup in Gov. Bruce Rauner’s office seems to signal a tougher stance on school funding. The state spending plan passed by the General Assembly requires adoption of a new funding formula, but Rauner has promised to veto the only school formula plan that got legislative approval. This standoff might make the lawsuit filed by 21 school superintendents more relevant.

 

The lawsuit, filed in April, demands that Illinois honor its constitutional obligation to provide a high quality education for all students.

The state of Illinois has a budget. But, that's not the case for the state's K through 12 schools.

Mt. Vernon Schools Superintendent Aletta Lawrence says the spending plan can't appropriate money for schools unless a new funding formula also wins approval.

In a maneuver some state lawmakers call a "booby trap," the spending plan approved last week says Illinois can't appropriate money for schools unless a new funding formula also wins approval.

Educators across the state are anxiously watching the special session in Springfield.

The lack of a budget for K through 12 schools has some wondering if they'll have to alter their calendars for the upcoming academic year.

People
Brad Palmer, WSIU Radio

There is a new Regional Superintendent of Schools for Williamson, Franklin, Johnson and Massac counties.

The four county chairmen Thursday unanimously approved Lorie LeQuatte to replace Matt Donkin, who is the new District Superintendent in West Frankfort.

Illinois lawmakers and Governor Bruce Rauner have yet to approve funding for K through 12 schools with the new academic year just over two months away.

A bill that would overhaul the way Illinois funds public schools passed a procedural hurdle Wednesday with bipartisan support.

Democratic State Senator Andy Manar, of Bunker Hill, is accusing Gov. Bruce Rauner of trying to kill his school funding legislation.

He says the administration fed erroneous information to a Republican operative's website.

It's hard to find an issue that unites Illinois lawmakers, yet members of both political parties and Governor Bruce Rauner have consistently agreed the state needs to change the way it funds schools. Now, with the filing of two separate legislative plans, that once-unison chorus sounds out of tune. State Senator Jason Barickman is the author of one of those plans. Our education desk reporter Dusty Rhodes quizzed him on how he intends to fix the flaws in the state's current funding formula.

Several Metro East school superintendents are among more than 400 school leaders calling on Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner and the state legislature to pass a budget. That’s on top of a lawsuit asking the state to give schools what they were promised.

Details of Illinois senate republicans’ school funding plan were revealed this week.

One week after State Senator Jason Barickman held a press conference to announce his own school funding plan, he filed two amendments totaling 500 pages.

A Republican state senator from Bloomington Wednesday became the third legislator to introduce a competing education funding plan.

Democratic state Sen. Andy Manar says he will remain in the Illinois Senate rather than run for governor in 2018.

In an emailed statement Friday, the Bunker Hill resident says he plans to continue being "a strong voice for the citizens of Central Illinois" in the Legislature.

School funding has been one of the most hotly debated issues in the statehouse, but in recent days, there’s been a glimmer of hope. A Democrat filed new funding plan, and a key Republican in the Illinois Senate appeared to endorse it, issuing a statement saying that he was “cautiously optimistic.” Was this the beginning of a bipartisan solution? We decided to do a reality check.

 

Education leaders from all over the state converged on Carbondale Friday, trying to move the issue of education funding forward in Illinois.

WSIU's Jennifer Fuller talks with Jak Tichenor and Delio Calzolari about the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute's upcoming Education Funding Forum.

People
Brad Palmer, WSIU Radio

Governor Bruce Rauner Tuesday visited Herrin Junior High School and discussed the need to pump more funding into K through 12 education.

A group of lawmakers has agreed on a framework for making the way Illinois funds its schools more equitable. But whether it will lead to a long-elusive legislative fix remains to be seen.

When it comes to equity in school funding, Illinois ranks last among all 50 states. So over the summer, various groups of lawmakers have been meeting with stakeholders, trying to come up with a plan that will send state dollars to the school districts that genuinely need help. Brent Clark has been attending all those meetings.

When it comes to school funding, Illinois has been ranked as the worst in the country because our system is so inequitable. Basically that means some schools offer a lot of advanced placement courses and have fancy science labs and swimming pools, while other schools can’t afford new math books and have to cut their band programs. The fight over how to fix this has gone on for years.

In July, Gov. Bruce Rauner announced that he was creating a bipartisan commission to change the way Illinois funds public schools. That commission held its third meeting yesterday. But there’s another commission tackling the same topic, and its founder claims her group is getting more work done.

Republican Governor Bruce Rauner Tuesday ripped a Democratic plan to fund schools in the new fiscal year that begins Friday, repeating criticism that it amounts to a ``bailout'' of Chicago Public Schools.

Democrats argue their plan treats Chicago schools the same as every other Illinois district.

Over 100 educators from more than 30 different school districts in southern Illinois attended a two-day professional development workshop this week in Williamson County.

If there’s one thing Illinois lawmakers agree on, it’s that they want schools to open on time in the fall. Yet the Illinois legislature adjourned last week with no school budget in place. That’s because when you ask lawmakers how to pay the teachers and principals and utility bills, they will bicker about it all session long. Their disagreement has left educators across the state saying W-T-F. And you know what that stands for... 

The head of the Murphysboro School District is warning parents, faculty and staff that - without state funding - the district cannot make it through the upcoming academic year.

People
Brad Palmer, WSIU Radio

Governor Rauner toured the state Wednesday to rip the democratic leadership for not approving a balanced budget before Tuesday night's deadline for the spring session.

Illinois’ school funding formula relies heavily on property taxes.

 

That leaves districts with low land values to make do with about six thousand dollars per student each year, while districts with thriving businesses can spend up to five times that amount.

 

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle agree that Illinois needs to change the formula, but they get caught on the question of how.

Pages