climate change

An international panel on climate change this week warned greenhouse gas emissions will keep increasing if left unchecked and called for urgent action. According to one Illinois scientist, that means frequent heavy rain events and flooding could become the norm.


A day after representatives from 196 parties signed an agreement that aims to curb climate change, it's time to start assessing its import.

Yesterday, Camila broke down the basics. Today, we've rounded up four pieces that help you understand the deal — and the politics around it — more deeply:

Leaders from around the world are converging on Paris for the 2015 U.N. Climate Change Conference. The two-week event is designed to allow countries the chance to come to an agreement on stifling climate change.

Below are 10 questions and answers that should better prepare you for the conference and what to expect during and after its completion.

Click the audio link at the top of this page to listen to "Heating Up," NPR's special on climate change, hosted by Ari Shapiro. Share it, download it, take it with you.

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United Nations

WSIU's Jennifer Fuller talks with United Nations Special Reporter Hilal Elver about her work on food security and climate change.

Ciril Jazbec/National Geographic

Weather patterns are shifting, ice caps are melting and sea levels are rising.   Climate change is the subject of the November issue of National Geographic magazine.  The entire issues is dedicated to exploring the issue as well as examining remedial actions.    WSIU's Jeff Williams talks with National Geographic magazine's Dennis Dimick for this edition of In The Author's Voice.   You can view the online edition here.