Morning Edition

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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep and David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. These hosts often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel around the world to report on the news firsthand.

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The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation is facing a fight to keep controversy from undermining its fundraising efforts.

After announcing that it would withdraw funding from Planned Parenthood screening programs last week — and then reversing that decision three days later — the foundation now faces the challenging task of repairing its image and trying to lure back disillusioned donors.

One of the nation's largest breast cancer charities, the foundation spends tens of millions of dollars annually on breast cancer research, education and screening.

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American farmers depend on the commodities market. The smallest change in the price of grain can increase their profit, or wipe it out. Corn farmers have done well in recent years, and some are using the cash in an effort to make themselves into players on the commodities market. They're investing in big grain bins, allowing them to hold on to their harvest until they get the price they want. Harvest Public Media's Kathleen Masterson reports.

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This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

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And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Here's the latest on the crisis in Syria. The U.S. State Department says it has closed the U.S. Embassy in Damascus, and evacuated its diplomats. The U.S. also issued a warning for all American citizens to leave the country immediately. A State Department spokewoman says the embassy was shut because of concerns that it's not sufficiently protected from armed attack.

The New York Giants came back with a last-minute score to beat the New England Patriots 21-17 Sunday night for New York's fourth Super Bowl title. It was a rematch of the 2008 NFL championship, when Eli Manning led New York past New England to ruin the Patriots' bid for a perfect season.

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For many chefs, winning the prize we'll talk about next is like winning the Super Bowl. But in the international contest's 26-year history, no American has ever won the Bocuse d'Or - that's D-apostrophe-O-R. The first step in deciding who represents the United States is a nation competition, which was recently held at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. Karen Michel was there.

This Sunday the annual Grammy Award winners will be announced. One of the biggest categories is Song of the Year, which goes to a songwriter. Every day this week, we'll give you a little intel on one of the nominees. Today, Bruno Mars' "Grenade."

Songs To Spin To, From A Fitness Guru

Feb 5, 2012

For the latest installment of The Ultimate NPR Workout Mix, Morning Edition reached out to someone who makes workout mixes for a living.

Justin Rubin teaches spin classes at Equinox Fitness in Los Angeles, where dozens of riders fill a dark room, pedaling against varying resistance levels on stationary bikes. Riders reserve their bikes online 26 hours before a class, and the bikes for Rubin's class are gone within minutes. The key to his popularity: People love his music.

Illinois Public Radio

The state's largest public employees union says Governor Pat Quinn is two-faced.

Earlier this week during his state of the state address, Governor Pat Quinn laid out an agenda that includes tax cuts and increased education spending. The state's largest public employees union says that belies Quinn's reasoning for withholding members' pay raises.

The Southern Illinoisan

Richard "Pete" Peterson yearns for the warm, summer days as he looks back at the baseball greats who passed away in 2011 for this edition of Reading Baseball.

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NPR's Business News starts with a reversal from the Komen Foundation. The Susan G. Komen For The Cure Foundation has just announced that it will not pull its funding for Planned Parenthood after all. The breast cancer charity endured a massive backlash when it announced, earlier this week, it would no longer give Planned Parenthood money for breast cancer screening. NPR's Julie Rovner joins us to explain the turnaround. And Julie, what exactly did the Komen Foundation say this morning?

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. OK, there's the graffiti artist who will make millions because he opted for stock over cash for painting murals at Facebook's offices. Then there's the contractor in Oshkosh who took Facebook stock for work on the home of Marianne Oleson. She claims she'd acquired the stock because her daughter knew Facebook's founder. But the stock is fake. Oleson is accused of fraud, and the contractor, not in for millions, but out thousands. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Poet Wislawa Szymborska of Poland died this week at the age of 88. Renee Montagne talks to Lawrence Weschler about her death. He covered Poland in the 1980s and '90s as a staff writer for The New Yorker. And Weschler has written about her in his books including his latest Uncanny Valley.

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NPR's business news starts with Facebook getting ready.

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Joining us now for some analysis of this ever-changing primary season is NPR's Cokie Roberts. Good morning.

COKIE ROBERTS, BYLINE: Hi, Renee.

'Consent' Asks: Who Owns The Internet?

Jan 29, 2012

While the Internet may aid the spread of democracy, democracy doesn't necessarily mean a free and open Internet. In her new book Consent of the Networked: The Worldwide Struggle for Internet Freedom, Rebecca MacKinnon, senior fellow at the New America Foundation and co-founder of Global Voices, a citizen media network, investigates the corrosion of civil liberties by the governments and corporations that control the digital world.

There's no quick fix for severe depression.

Although antidepressants like Prozac have been around since the 1970s, they usually take weeks to make a difference. And for up to 40 percent of patients, they simply don't work.

As a result, there are limited options when patients show up in an emergency room with suicidal depression.

The doctors and nurses at Ben Taub General Hospital in Houston say they see this problem every day.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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WSIU Radio's Jennifer Fuller interviews SIUC Chancellor Rita Cheng about ongoing contract negotiations, as the faculty strike continues for a seventh day.

Later, Fuller also interviews SIUC FA Spokesman Dave Johnson about the outstanding issues in contract negotiations, as the faculty strike enters its seventh day.

It was one year ago that the Tea Party movement helped Republicans take control of the U.S. House of Representatives. With the presidential election a year away, the movement finds itself searching for ways to have the same kind of impact this time around.

The Tea Party celebrated on election night last year with candidates like Rand Paul, who captured a Senate seat in Kentucky.

"Tonight there's a Tea Party tidal wave, and we're sending a message to them," Paul said in his victory speech.

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