Morning Edition

HD 1: Weekdays from 4AM-9AM

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep and David Greene in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. These hosts often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel around the world to report on the news firsthand.

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HD 1: Weekdays from 4AM-9AM

The Last Word In Business

Feb 16, 2012

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Today's last word in business is: snap, crackle and crunch.

Kellogg, the name behind many boxes in the cereal aisle, will now have its name on cans of Pringles. Kellogg bought the potato chip brand from Proctor and Gamble yesterday for $2.7 billion. The company put down the big bucks for Pringles to capitalize on yet another growing consumer demand in places like China and India - a new taste for snack.

And that's the business news from MORNING EDITION on NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

WSIU Radio's Jennifer Fuller has the latest local and state news... along with weather information to start your day.

Snapping Sea Lion Takes Aim At Shakira

Feb 15, 2012

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Warm Canadian Winter Thaws Outdoor Fun

Feb 15, 2012

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

We're following several developments in Iran's confrontation with the west. President Obama's administration is talking of even stricter sanctions against Iran's financial system. That's part of an effort to pressure Iran to abandon its nuclear ambitions.

The Greece debt crisis has forced the country to look to the eurozone for a bailout. But Greece is looking less and less like part of Europe. In the capital Athens, they are still cleaning up from the weekend riots. Even in its tourist precincts, the area is shabby and covered with graffiti.

Congress appears to have avoided another showdown over the payroll tax reduction that has been pumping billions of dollars back into the economy. There may even be a deal ahead on jobless benefits and payments to Medicare doctors.

The last time Congress extended the payroll tax holiday was in December, when it passed a two-month extension tied to two other measures. One extended unemployment benefits, and the second fixed a formula by which Medicare doctors are paid. The Medicare fix would stop big cuts in reimbursements for doctors.

Business News

Feb 15, 2012

Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne have business news.

Fashion Week 2012: Coats Make A Comeback

Feb 14, 2012

New York Fashion Week may be coming to a close on Thursday, but a cycle of fashion shows in cities around the world is just about to begin. Fashion editors and store buyers will descend upon London, Milan and Paris to inspect clothes that may appear in stores next fall. Sally Singer — editor-in-chief of T: The New York Times Style Magazine — is one of those tastemaking jet-setters, and she joins NPR's Renee Montagne to talk about 2012's trends.

From MAP Grants to Graduation, Polar Bear to COLA renaming, SIUC Chancellor Rita Cheng talks about what's going on at SIUC right now. Join Morning Conversation Host Jennifer Fuller for this week's interview.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. On this day 50 years ago, the first lady offered a Valentine to America, a televised tour of the newly restored White House. Jacqueline Kennedy had been shocked at how little of the past was in the White House, so she threw her heart into bringing that history back. Teddy Roosevelt's rugs, an oak desk given by Queen Victoria, a rare portrait of Benjamin Franklin. And Americans loved it, with a record number tuning into her TV tour. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Croatia's Museum Of Broken Relationships

Feb 14, 2012

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The man who is expected to become China's next president begins highly anticipated meetings in Washington on Tuesday. The trip comes as the Obama administration seeks to shift the emphasis of U.S. strategy toward the Asia-Pacific region — including changes the Chinese aren't sure they like.

Pa.'s Gas Boom Worsens Low-Cost Housing Shortage

Feb 14, 2012

The natural gas boom in Pennsylvania has new workers flooding into the state. That's causing a housing crunch in some communities, as locals get priced out of the rental market. One rural county in the northern part of the state has opened its first homeless shelter.

About 40 percent of TV households have digital video recorders. Once you have one, you may think differently about the shows you watch. TV critic Eric Deggans of the Tampa Bay Times has found some hidden meanings in the TV series his DVR tapes week after week.

Networking Tips from the Ultimate Networker

Feb 13, 2012

"Relatively few people should start companies," Reid Hoffman says bluntly. And he should know. As a co-founder of popular social networking website LinkedIn and an influential Silicon Valley angel investor, he has engineered several startup success stories — and now he has distilled his business wisdom into a book, The Start-up of You: Adapt to the Future, Invest in Yourself, and Transform Your Career.

Paul McCartney, Madonna, Doc Watson and Luciano Pavarotti have at least one thing in common: They've all collaborated with Irish folk band

February is Heart Month. As Americans continue to learn more about how to prevent heart attacks and stroke, doctors are focusing not just on prevention, but also after care for those who've suffered a cardiac event.  WSIU Radio's Jennifer Fuller reports on one local cardiac rehab program.

WSIU Radio's Jennifer Fuller has the latest on a Winter Weather Advisory for the region, as well as state and local news from the weekend and into your work week.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Presidential candidate Mitt Romney made news when he disclosed he had a Swiss bank account. Many affluent Americans do. Now, an AP writer has assembled a step-by-step guide on how you too can stash a million dollars offshore. Step four is choose a country. Switzerland isn't your only choice. Hong Kong is popular too. Step two is decide whether to tell the IRS. But the toughest part is still step one - get a million dollars.

Midwest Property Services is testing the DNA of 200 dogs. Their owners live in apartments around Sioux Falls, S.D. The Argus Leader reports the DNA will go into a database. That will make it possible to identify which owners fail to clean up after their dogs.

The Last Word In Business

Feb 13, 2012

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

Greek Protesters Rally Against Drastic Cuts

Feb 13, 2012

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Even as Greek lawmakers approved another round of austerity, Greek protesters registered their dissent over the weekend. The bailout package is part of an effort by creditors to save Greece from default and a possible exit from the euro. European leaders now need to sign off on the deal, but many people are beginning to wonder if saving Greece is possible. Greeks themselves say austerity is killing them. Joanna Kakissis reports from Athens.

(SOUNDBITE OF EXPLOSION)

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The U.S. economy is improving, even though Americans keep having to look over their shoulders at Europe. The state of the economy affects everything in American politics right now, from the presidential election to the budget that the White House lays out today.

NPR's Cokie Roberts has some analysis, as she does the most Mondays. Cokie, good morning.

COKIE ROBERTS, BYLINE: Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: OK, so what does the president's budget tell us?

The Obama administration has revised a provision of the president's health care law concerning birth control coverage. Now, religious-affiliated organizations may decline to provide the coverage, but allow the employees to get free contraceptives through their health insurer. NPR's Allison Keyes went to a Catholic church to ask parishioners what they think of the debate over birth control in health care coverage.

Business News

Feb 13, 2012

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business new starts with trouble for Apple in a giant market.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The trouble for Apple has come as it tries to sell its iPad tablet computers in China. In a city not far from Beijing, authorities have been seizing iPads from shopping malls and other retailers - not because they're fake, but because a Chinese company claims that it owns the iPad name. The company in question is Shenzhen Proview, and it registered the iPad name in China in 2001.

Adele Sweeps The Grammy Awards

Feb 13, 2012

Audio: Mandalit Del Barco reports from the Grammy Awards in Los Angeles for Morning Edition.


It was nice of everybody else to show up.

Adele, whose 21 is the fastest-selling album in eight years, went six-for-six at the Grammy Awards, including wins in the top three categories: Album, Record and Song of the year.

In the Oscar-nominated film Moneyball, Brad Pitt plays Billy Beane, a baseball manager obsessed with turning his cash-strapped team into a contender. Pitt says that drive is what attracted him to the role that has earned him a best-actor nod.

PBS's hit series Downton Abbey has been praised for its subtle and witty dialogue. But a few anachronisms have slipped into the characters' conversations, and spotting them has become a hobby for many fans.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday morning, it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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