Here & Now

HD 1: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young

A live production from NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening, with timely, smart and in-depth news and conversation.

Here & Now has a successful track record: it began at WBUR in 1997 and is carried today by over 180 stations nationwide. Here & Now will expand from one to two hours on July 1 in collaboration with NPR. The expanded program will serve as a bridge in midday, between NPR’s signature news magazines, Morning Edition and All Things Considered. This marks the first time NPR has collaborated with a member station on a daily news program.

Here & Now has been hosted by Robin Young for more than a decade. A Peabody Award-winning journalist, she has reported for NBC, CBS and ABC television, and was substitute host and correspondent for The Today Show. Starting July 1, Young will be joined by co-host Jeremy Hobson, most recently host of Marketplace Morning Report. Hobson has broad producing, reporting and hosting experience at the station, program and network level. Additionally, Meghna Chakrabarti, co-host of WBUR’s Radio Boston, has been named as the program’s primary back-up host.

HD 1: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm
HD 2: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm

Ways to Connect

Florida Keys residents are beginning to make the 113-mile journey on the Overseas Highway to the mainland, ahead of Hurricane Irma.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson checks in with WLRN’s Nancy Klingener (@keywestnan), who is on Key West.

President Trump overruled congressional Republicans and his own treasury secretary Wednesday and cut a deal with Democrats to fund the government and raise the federal borrowing limit for three months, all part of an agreement to speed money to Harvey relief.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young discusses the latest with NPR’s Domenico Montanaro (@DomenicoNPR).

Now that school’s back in session, first-year college students are making the adjustment to campus life, which can be a big change from high school. And high school seniors who are applying to college should be thinking about who to ask for recommendation letters.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Lisa Micele (@LisaMicele), director of college counseling at the University of Illinois Laboratory High School in Urbana, Illinois, to get some advice for students.

The name “Calhoun” will be removed Tuesday from a residential building at Yale University. John C. Calhoun was a Yale graduate, U.S. vice president and a white supremacist who supported slavery. Student activists, faculty and some members of the community lobbied the administration to change the name, which they viewed as a symbol of racism.

Here & Now's Phoebe Petrovic (@phoebepetrovic) reports.

Thais Marques was marching at the base of New York’s Trump Tower Tuesday when the White House announced its plans to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA.

Marques (@thais_tweets), who was brought to the U.S. illegally from Brazil at the age of 5, has been a beneficiary of the program for more than four years. Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with her.

Hurricane season is in full swing and another powerful storm is brewing in the Atlantic. Irma, a Category 5 hurricane, is expected to make landfall in the Virgin Islands, Cuba, Hispaniola and Puerto Rico this week. Florida is also taking precautions for Irma’s blow.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Jeff Huffman (@HuffmanHeadsUp), director and chief meteorologist of the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network, about Hurricane Irma.

The United Nations Security Council held another emergency session on North Korea Monday after criticizing Pyongyang’s nuclear test over the weekend.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Abe Denmark (@AbeDenmark), director of the Asia Program at the Wilson Center and a former deputy assistant secretary of defense for East Asia.

Harvey was a 1,000-year flood event, according to a new analysis from the University of Wisconsin’s Space Science and Engineering Center. As recovery efforts continue, scientists are studying how much climate change had to do with Harvey’s record-setting rainfall and unusual path over Texas, drawing on data gathered from Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy.

Like many families in Houston, the Garcia family was forced to leave their home as floodwaters rose. They tried to save important documents, photos and some other items.

Now that the floods have receded, the Garcias have returned home to clean up and see what’s salvageable. Christopher Connelly (@hithisischris) of KERA reports.

In the wake of disasters, there are a lot of people who need help — and a lot of people who want to offer it.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Bob Ottenhoff (@BobOttenhoff), president and CEO of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, about the best ways to give after a disaster.

Beaumont, Texas, is without running water after service from the main pump station broke down due to rising waters from the Naches River. Beaumont was hit by an intense second round of rain Wednesday, which left that region underwater.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young checks in with NPR’s Debbie Elliott (@NPRDebElliott) from Beaumont.

Some former homeland security officials have criticized the Trump administration for focusing on Muslim extremists at the expense of efforts to combat violent white supremacists at a time when hate crimes are on the rise. That conversation has taken on a new urgency since Charlottesville.

Lorrine Adamore is holed up in one of the three shelters the city of Dallas has set up for people fleeing Hurricane Harvey, now a tropical storm. It’s a familiar, and unsettling feeling. Twelve years ago she was rescued by boat when her New Orleans home was swamped by Hurricane Katrina and she relocated to Houston.

When Will The Rain Stop In Texas?

Aug 29, 2017

It’s been four days since Harvey struck Texas’ southeastern coast as a Category 4 hurricane. Harvey, now a tropical storm, has dumped more than 43 inches of rain in southern Houston since Friday, and forecasts predict more is on the way for the region and parts of southwestern Louisiana.

Officials expect more than 30,000 people may be forced out of their homes in Texas by surging flood waters. The damage is raising questions not only about the state’s preparation leading up to now-Tropical Storm Harvey, but also about the layout of its natural landscape and urban design.

Catastrophic Flooding Inundates Houston

Aug 28, 2017

Harvey, now a tropical storm, is expected to drop more heavy rain on the Houston area Monday. Officials say once Harvey moves out, drainage will continue to be a problem, and flooding that’s already devastated the region could get worse.

Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti checks in on recovery efforts with NPR’s Nathan Rott (@NathanRott) in Texas.

Hurricane Harvey is expected to make landfall near Corpus Christi, Texas, late tonight or early Saturday. Officials are warning the storm surge and torrential rain could cause significant damage.

KUT reporter Claire McInerny (@ClaireMcInerny) is in Victoria, Texas, and joins Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins with the latest on evacuations and storm preparations.

In Yemen, years of war have driven millions of people from their homes and left millions more without enough food and at risk of cholera.

Matthew Tueller (@USEmbassyYemen), the American ambassador to Yemen, tells Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti that the U.S. hopes to bring the warring sides together to try to negotiate a resolution.

Life-threatening allergic reactions to foods have increased by five times over the last decade, according to a new analysis of private insurance claims by FAIR Health, an independent nonprofit that collects and analyzes data on privately billed health insurance claims.

The National Hurricane Center says Tropical Storm Harvey is now Hurricane Harvey and is forecasting it will become a major hurricane to hit the middle Texas coastline.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti finds out what to expect from the storm over the weekend from Jen Carfagno (@JenCarfagno), meteorologist and host of “AMHQ” at The Weather Channel.

At least 20 organizations, including the American Red Cross and Cleveland Clinic, have now canceled fundraising events scheduled at President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida. But why do charities put on expensive galas in the first place?

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Doug White, former director of the Columbia University nonprofit management program, about what motivates nonprofits to spend big dollars at places like Mar-a-Lago.

Already this year, more than 6,000 people have illegally walked across the U.S. border into Quebec. Nearly half of them crossed last month. One of the most popular illegal border crossing areas is in Vermont just west of Lake Champlain, along a rural road in the woods.

Vermont Public Radio’s Kathleen Masterson (@kathmasterson) went to the border crossing spot, and has this report.

Grayson, Kentucky, cafeteria manager Jason Smith didn’t have any formal culinary training, but he had a dream: to be a Food Network star. After 10 weeks of cooking, food demonstrations and exuding plenty of Southern charm, Smith’s dream came true.

Selling rhino horn internationally has been illegal for 40 years. But it’s now legal to sell rhino horn within the borders of South Africa, the country with 80 percent of the world’s rhinos. A court there removed a moratorium on the domestic rhino horn trade earlier this year.

As NPR’s Peter Granitz (@pgranitz) reports from the capital, Pretoria, one rhino farmer in South Africa hopes to auction some of his stockpiled rhino horn — and the sale is not without controversy.

Clemson, South Carolina, was one of the places across the U.S. located in the solar eclipse’s path of totality.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Nell Greenfieldboyce (@nell_sci_NPR), NPR science correspondent, about what she and other viewers in Clemson witnessed.

Ten sailors are missing from the USS John McCain after a collision with an oil tanker in Southeast Asian waters.

Bradley Peniston (@navybook), deputy editor at Defense One, says it’s the fourth collision involving a U.S. Navy ship in just over a year. Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets the latest.

Doctors are warning spectators not to look directly at the sun without protection during Monday’s eclipse. It can cause permanent damage like solar retinopathy or blindness, especially for people outside the path of totality.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Dr. Nhung H. Brandenburg, president of the Georgia Optometric Association, about how to view the eclipse safely.

How Did North Korea Get Nuclear Weapons?

Aug 17, 2017

In an interview with The American Prospect, White House strategist Steve Bannon said “there’s no military solution” to North Korea’s growing nuclear weapons program. Going against President Trump’s threat of “fire and fury,” Bannon suggested Trump should tone down the brinkmanship with North Korea and focus on China instead.

But how did North Korea get its nuclear weapons in the first place?

Attacker Drives Van Into Barcelona Crowd

Aug 17, 2017

A white van jumped up onto a sidewalk and sped down a pedestrian zone Thursday in Barcelona’s historic Las Ramblas district, swerving from side to side as it plowed into tourists and residents.

NPR’s Camila Domonoske (@camilareads) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young with the latest.

With reporting from The Associated Press

President Trump is placing blame for the violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville over the weekend on “both sides,” including counter-protesters. But what is true about what happened that day?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Sarah Rankin (@sarah_rankin), a reporter for The Associated Press who was in Charlottesville that day.

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