Here & Now

HD 1: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young

A live production from NPR and WBUR Boston, in collaboration with public radio stations across the country, Here & Now reflects the fluid world of news as it’s happening, with timely, smart and in-depth news and conversation.

Here & Now has a successful track record: it began at WBUR in 1997 and is carried today by over 180 stations nationwide. Here & Now will expand from one to two hours on July 1 in collaboration with NPR. The expanded program will serve as a bridge in midday, between NPR’s signature news magazines, Morning Edition and All Things Considered. This marks the first time NPR has collaborated with a member station on a daily news program.

Here & Now has been hosted by Robin Young for more than a decade. A Peabody Award-winning journalist, she has reported for NBC, CBS and ABC television, and was substitute host and correspondent for The Today Show. Starting July 1, Young will be joined by co-host Jeremy Hobson, most recently host of Marketplace Morning Report. Hobson has broad producing, reporting and hosting experience at the station, program and network level. Additionally, Meghna Chakrabarti, co-host of WBUR’s Radio Boston, has been named as the program’s primary back-up host.

HD 1: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm
HD 2: Weekdays from 12pm-2pm

Ways to Connect

President Obama is in California today for a short visit that includes an appearance on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.”

His visits cause a bit of panic, with drivers concerned about major traffic headaches, but some say it’s much ado about nothing.

Mixing chemicals in a high school lab is challenging enough. Imagine doing it if you were blind.

A group of visually impaired students from all over the country had that chance at Metro State University in Denver recently.

It’s part of an effort to get more blind people interested in science, technology and math — fields in which they are severely underrepresented in the workforce.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Jenny Brundin of Colorado Public Radio has more.

New IVF Technique Raises Ethical Questions

Aug 6, 2013

A Philadelphia baby, born in May, is the first child in the world conceived using a new in vitro fertilization (IVF) technique, which screens embryos for chromosomal disorders and abnormalities before implantation.

People who use this technique will avoid implanting chromosomally abnormal embryos that would result in either not becoming pregnant, or in miscarriage.

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