Sean Crawford

Chatham

Advisory Board Ex-Officio

217-206-6408

Sean has led WUIS' news operations since the fall of 2009. He replaced the only other person to do so in the station's history, Rich Bradley. Prior to taking over the News Department, Sean worked as Statehouse Bureau Chief for WUIS and other Illinois Public Radio stations. He spent more than a dozen years on the capitol beat.

Sean  began his broadcasting career at his hometown station in Herrin, Illinois while still in high school.  It was there he learned to cover local government, courts and anything else that made the news.  He spent time in the Joliet area as News Director and Operations Manager for a radio station and worked for a chain of weekly newspapers for two years.  Along with news coverage, he reported heavily on sports and did on-air play by play. 

Sean holds a Master's Degree in Public Affairs Reporting from the University of Illinois Springfield. 

The Illinois state pension funds are among the worst-funded in the nation.  Yet, a new state law allows less money to be put toward that purpose. 

The Illinois Audubon Society began in 1897 in Chicago as a way to combat bird feathers being used in hats.  Today, it’s the oldest independent conservation organization in the state.

Higher education has been among the areas feeling the state budget impasse as funding has been cut.  It has forced some schools to reduce classes, lay off employees and, in some cases, close for several days. 

But a review of enrollment indicates small and mid-sized public universities are taking a double hit.   

Tenured and tenure-track professors at the University of Illinois Springfield are on strike starting today.  Nearly 170 professors belong to the union that will take to the picket line this morning. 

The decline of the monarch butterfly population has led researchers to look for reasons why. 

A popular theory is the loss of milkweed, the only plant on which monarch larvae feed.  But a study from the Illinois Natural History Survey at the University of Illinois indicates that's not the sole culprit.  

As Illinois remains mired in gridlock and nearing two years without a full budget, voters are pinning the blame on state leaders.

This weekend is Abraham Lincoln's birthday.  Yet today, we examine his death and reaction to it.

We've all heard how the nation was sent into a period of shock and grief when word of Lincoln's murder spread.  Newspapers reported it that way.  But what about the average American, North and South, black and white?

While Hillary Clinton won the presidential race in the State of Illinois, a lot of voters chose "none of the above."  

Teenagers are texting while behind the wheel, despite the law prohibiting it.  And that's not all they're doing. 

New Harmony, Indiana, is a special place to stop and smell the roses – or at least the red geraniums. Fall is an especially good time to visit with colors abounding and temperatures moderating.

Founded in 1814 by a German communal society and sold 10 years later to a Welsh visionary, the town of 800 in far southwestern Indiana along the Wabash River has deep roots in contemplation, nature and the arts.

Illinois is one of the states considered most at risk for a major earthquake.  This week, officials are trying to get people thinking safety.  

History has Ulysses S. Grant playing second fiddle to Abraham Lincoln -- and many others.  But it wasn't always that way.

In a small pond in Wisconsin,  a recent study took place that could have some big implications when it comes to the spread of Asian Carp.  
 
The invasive species threatens to take over waterways, like the Great Lakes. It's already become a major problem in the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers and elsewhere.  

Warmer and wetter than normal.  That's the prediction for the upcoming months, according to the National Weather Service.

It's another long, hot summer for the horse racing industry in Illinois.  

The payoff for waiting at a driver's license facility?  Getting a new license.  Along with being legal to drive,  it allows you to use it for identification purposes, like boarding an airplane.   But changes are coming to the process here in Illinois.

An attempt to add a surtax on Illinois millionaires failed in the Illinois House. 

House Speaker and Democrat Michael Madigan has backed the idea that would raise more money for schools.

An archaeological discovery in Illinois has received worldwide recognition.  Evidence of a prehistoric city well preserved under present day East St. Louis has been found, dug up and is being analyzed.

Listen to our broadcast of the Governor's Address with reaction from House Speaker Michael Madigan, Senate President John Cullerton and Republican Leaders Rep. Jim Durkin and Sen. Christine Radogno.

Rich Miller of Capitol Fax and NPR Illinois' Amanda Vinicky join host Jak Tichenor for the broadcast:

Governor Bruce Rauner says action he has taken without the General Assembly will help the state attract businesses and jobs. 

When students return to class in January, their school buildings will be required to have carbon monoxide alarms.  A new law goes into effect Jan. 1.

More people died from drug overdoses in the United States in 2014 than during any previous year on record. The numbers have doubled in just the past 15 years.   

The state's largest public employee union remains at odds with Governor Rauner's administration on a new contract.  

The new Republican state representative for the Springfield area says she won't always agree with the governor.  

DNA evidence remains a powerful tool to convict, but also to exonerate.

7 people have died from a Legionnaires' Disease outbreak in western Illinois, the state announced Tuesday. 

The cases all involve residents of the Illinois Veterans' Home in Quincy.  The Department of Veteran's Affairs says all had underlying medical conditions.   

Despite the U.S. being reliant on China for exports, many Americans have a hard time understanding what is taking place with the world's largest economy. 

We figured it was a good time to bring in Roy Wehrle, Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Illinois Springfield. 

A Chicago alderman has proposed a penny per ounce tax on sugary drinks in that city.  There is also an effort to make that happen statewide.

You may be asking: How did Illinois get to this point?