NPR News

For the hundreds of rural U.S. hospitals struggling to stay in business, health policy decisions made in Washington, D.C., this summer could make survival a lot tougher.

The list of preventive services that women can receive without paying anything out of pocket under the health law could grow if recommendations from a group of mostly medical providers are adopted by federal officials later this year.

Much of the anger and anxiety in the 2016 election is fueled by the sense that economic opportunity is slipping away for many Americans. This week, as part of NPR's collaborative project with member stations, A Nation Engaged, we're asking the question: What can be done to create economic opportunity for more Americans?

About one in five children in the United States shows signs of a mental health disorder — anything from ADHD to eating disorders to suicide.

And yet, as we've been reporting this month, many schools aren't prepared to work with these students. Often, there's been too little training in recognizing the problems, the staff who are trained are overworked, and there just isn't enough money.

This story is part of our NPR Ed series on mental health in schools.

In the waning days of summer vacation, Sydney and Laney are enjoying their final moments of freedom flipping over a high bar at a playground close by their house in Spartanburg, S.C.

"You've got to pull your hips into the bar," says their mom, Selena, motioning to the girls, "you've got to kick up like that!"

"I tried to kick!" Laney says indignantly. "I did this – you told me not to stick out!"

Turkey's justice minister says that some 6,000 people have been detained following a failed coup attempt.

That includes some 3,000 military personnel detained in bases around the country, as NPR's Leila Fadel tells Weekend Edition Sunday.

According to Turkey's foreign ministry, the incident killed at least 290 people — more than 100 people involved in the attempted coup, and 190 other citizens. At least 1400 people were wounded.

Our world shares today much of what would be inaccessible if not for our unprecedented interconnectedness. We share car rides using smartphone apps. We share our spare rooms with strangers who don't simply want to be tourists in a new city. We share videos and photos of our good times and our bad — especially when our bad times include violent images and photos of people being attacked or killed.

A gunman opened fire on a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla., early Sunday morning, killing at least 50 people in the deadliest mass shooting in recent U.S. history before being shot dead by police.

Gaby remembers the first time she threw up while taking a test. It was a few months ago, early on in her freshman year at Marblehead High School in Massachusetts.

She was sitting in biology class when, she recalls, she got so anxious that she excused herself to the bathroom.

Gaby typically starts her day at 6 a.m. and gets to school at 7:15. On Mondays she runs a government club called Junior State of America. She's also running for class president, sits on the women's rights awareness group, and helps out at the school's rotary club.

Donald Trump’s rise to the likely Republican presidential nomination means tough choices for senators across the country preparing for re-election bids. NPR’s Jessica Taylor talks with Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson about which senators look to be most affected by distancing themselves, or not, from Trump.

What's more harmful to patients being treated for drug or alcohol use: Risking their health by keeping other medical providers in the dark about the care, or risking the patients' jobs, homes and child custody arrangements by allowing potentially damaging details to be shared widely among providers?

Belgian police have arrested two people suspected of planning to attack popular tourist spots during New Year's celebrations.

The Brussels public prosecutor says the suspects posed a "serious threat of attack," Teri Schultz, reporting from Brussels, tells our Newscast unit. Here's more from Teri:

The Obama administration is weighing whether to grant a request made Monday by TransCanada Corporation — the company that wants to build the controversial Keystone XL pipeline from Canada into the U.S. — to pause a review of its permit application for the pipeline.

That could delay a decision on the pipeline until after the 2016 presidential election. Last night, author and environmentalist Bill McKibben, who’s led opposition to the pipeline for years, tweeted “When we fight we win. So we should fight.”

A drought in the Mexican state of Chiapas has led to the reappearance of a mid-16th century church.

Lack of rain in southern Mexico has dropped the water level in the Nezahualcoyotl reservoir, revealing the Temple of Santiago, a church built in in 1564.

In 1957, Joel Healy witnessed one of the largest nuclear tests ever conducted on U.S. soil.

Healy was in the U.S. Army, stationed in the Nevada desert north of Las Vegas at Camp Desert Rock. He was 17 years old and a private first class at the time.

Healy drove dump trucks, moved materials, and built structures, like houses, that would be destroyed by the explosions so the Army could study the effects of a nuclear blast. He also helped build the towers where many of the bombs were detonated.